blush

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blush

1. a reddish or pinkish tinge
2. a cloudy area on the surface of freshly applied gloss paint
References in classic literature ?
A single glance told her that their recent conversation had been more than usually interesting; nor could I help seeing it myself--the face of the governess being red, or in that condition which, were she aught but a governess, would be called suffused with blushes.
The consequence of these blushes, of these interchanged sighs, and of this royal agitation, was, that Montalais had committed an indiscretion which had certainly affected her companion, for Mademoiselle de la Valliere, less clear sighted, perhaps, turned pale when the king blushed; and her attendance being required upon Madame, she tremblingly followed the princess without thinking of taking the gloves, which court etiquette required her to do.
When he knew Manuel better the mere thought of the mistake he might have made would cover him with hot, uneasy blushes in his bunk.
During the marriage ceremony the bride was covered with blushes, but the bridegroom's face was pale.
Blushes came with difficulty on her dead-white complexion, under the negligently twisted opu- lence of mahogany-coloured hair.
She's gone into the West, To dazzle when the sun is down, And rob the world of rest; She took our daylight with her, The smiles that we love best, With morning blushes on her cheek, And pearls upon her breast.
And then they ask him why he blushes, and why he stammers, and why he always speaks in an almost inaudible tone, as if they thought he did it on purpose.
She told all this to Philip with pretty sighs and becoming blushes, and showed him the photograph of the gay lieutenant.
Judging by what they tell me, a girl blushes when her lover pleads with her to favor his addresses.
However, she had, on such occasions, the advantage of concealing her blushes from the eyes of men; and
Pickwick, with sundry blushes, produced the following little tale, as having been 'edited' by himself, during his recent indisposition, from his notes of Mr.