board

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board

1. the boards the acting profession; the stage
2. short for blackboard, chessboard, notice board, printed circuit board (see printed circuit), springboard, surfboard
3. Nautical
a. the side of a ship
b. the leg that a sailing vessel makes on a beat to windward
4. 
a. any of various portable surfaces specially designed for indoor games such as chess, backgammon, etc
b. (as modifier): board games
5. 
a. a set of hands in duplicate bridge
b. a wooden or metal board containing four slots, or often nowadays, a plastic wallet, in which the four hands are placed so that the deal may be replayed with identical hands
6. the hull of a sailboard, usually made of plastic, to which the mast is jointed and on which a windsurfer stands
7. sweep the board (in gambling) to win all the cards or money

Board

A long thin piece of lumber cut from a log; typically with a rectangular cross section; can be hand-hewn, hand-sawn, or mill-sawn.

Board

 

a usually rectangular plate of a specific size made from an electrically insulating material that is used in electrical and electronic apparatus as a base for the positioning and mechanical attachment of electrical and electronic components. It may also be used for the application of printed components and for the electrical interconnection of the components by means of wire or printed circuits.

Boards must provide the best possible characteristics for mechanical and electrical strength, stability of geometric dimensions and electrical parameters, resistance to climatic and mechanical influences, and ease of machining. These requirements vary depending on the intended use of the board, the operating conditions, and the arrangement of components. Materials usually used for boards include laminated plastics (electrical Micarta, textolite, and fiberglass laminate), phenol plastics, fluoroplastics, and molding materials of the AG-4 type.

board

[′bȯrd]
(materials)
A piece of lumber whose dimensions are less than 2 inches (5 centimeters) thick and between 4 and 12 inches (10 and 30 centimeters) wide.

board

1. Lumber less than 2 in. (5 cm) thick and between 4 in. (10 cm) and 12 in. (30 cm) in width; a board less than 4 in. (10 cm) wide may be classified as a strip.
2. Short for switchboard.
3. A box-office ticket board or seating chart.

board

(1)
In-context synonym for bboard; sometimes used even for Usenet newsgroups.

board

(2)
An electronic circuit board.
References in classic literature ?
I now began to consider that I might yet get a great many things out of the ship which would be useful to me, and particularly some of the rigging and sails, and such other things as might come to land; and I resolved to make another voyage on board the vessel, if possible.
I got on board the ship as before, and prepared a second raft; and, having had experience of the first, I neither made this so unwieldy, nor loaded it so hard, but yet I brought away several things very useful to me; as first, in the carpenters stores I found two or three bags full of nails and spikes, a great screw- jack, a dozen or two of hatchets, and, above all, that most useful thing called a grindstone.
The ship began now to fill; several passengers came on board, who were embarked on no criminal account, and these had accommodations assigned them in the great cabin, and other parts of the ship, whereas we, as convicts, were thrust down below, I know not where.
But all the while the Morisco Christian was telling her strange story, an elderly pilgrim, who had come on board of the galley at the same time as the viceroy, kept his eyes fixed upon her; and the instant she ceased speaking he threw himself at her feet, and embracing them said in a voice broken by sobs and sighs, "O Ana Felix, my unhappy daughter, I am thy father Ricote, come back to look for thee, unable to live without thee, my soul that thou art
I must admit that he did not believe in the unicorn, and was the only one on board who did not share that universal conviction.
Oliver brushed away two or three tears that were lingering in his eyes; and seeing no board but the table, fortunately bowed to that.
The anchorage proving unsafe, and water difficult to be procured, the captain stood out to sea, and made repeated signals for those on shore to rejoin the ship, but it was not until nine at night that they came on board.
Such a number of women and children have no right to be comfortable on board.
But they all rejected the proposal, and said they would have nothing to do with me any more; and if I came on board they would all go on shore.
It's the sort of thing I've been hearing more or less ever since I came on board.
Hermann, an engaging, stout housewife, wore on board baggy blue dresses with white dots.
On the day in which I visited the ship (the fourteenth), Wyatt and party were also to visit it--so the captain informed me--and I waited on board an hour longer than I had designed, in hope of being presented to the bride, but then an apology came.