boat


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boat,

small, open nautical vessel propelled by sail, oar, pole, paddle, or motor. The use of the term boat for larger vessels, although common, is somewhat improper, but the line between boats and ships is not easy to draw. A number of special types of boat are generally referred to by their individual names rather than by the generic term, e.g., the canoecanoe
, long, narrow watercraft with sharp ends originally used by most peoples. It is usually propelled by means of paddles, although sails and, more recently, outboard motors are also used.
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, the kayakkayak
, Eskimo canoe, originally made of sealskin stretched over a framework of whalebone or driftwood. It is completely covered except for the opening in which the paddler sits.
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 (Eskimo decked canoe), and the umiak (Eskimo open boat). Simple dugouts, made from hollowed-out logs, have been known since prehistoric times to all peoples dwelling on waterways. The ancient Egyptians used boats made of acacia wood and held together with pegs. Modern wooden boats are built in four ways: with fore-and-aft planks laid with their edges flush (carvel-built); with fore-and-aft planks laid with overlapping edges (clinker-built); with inner and outer layers of planks running diagonally in opposite directions; and with planking consisting of large sheets of plywood. Many boats, however, are now made of molded fiberglass or of aluminum. Primitive boats in many parts of the world are stabilized by an outrigger—a parallel float attached by projecting arms. The varieties of boats in modern use are almost infinite. The Chinese junk, with high poop and overhanging bow, is large enough to be classified as a ship; the junk, together with the sampan (a wide, flat-bottomed skiff, often having a mat-covered cabin with living quarters), is a familiar sight in the rivers and coastal waters of East Asia. The lateen-rigged dhow, in which energetic Arab merchants of the Middle Ages plied their trade along all the shores of S Asia and E Africa, is still in use today. A familiar local craft on the Mediterranean is the flat-bottomed, canoelike, pole-driven gondola of the Venetian canals. A typical Mediterranean vessel of ancient times was the galleygalley,
long, narrow vessel widely used in ancient and medieval times, propelled principally by oars but also fitted with sails. The earliest type was sometimes 150 ft (46 m) long with 50 oars.
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, usually propelled by oars. Because the northern seas were stormier, the Viking boats, which the Norsemen were building by the 5th cent. A.D., were more seaworthy; they were believed to be the first clinker-built boats. Deckless or half-decked, with elevated bow and stern, these early boats took the Norsemen to all the coasts of Europe and across the Atlantic. The later rugged whaleboat was developed from the Viking type of construction and came to be used for numerous purposes. The fishing boats of the North and Baltic seas, also built on Viking principles, are roughly similar to whaleboats. Another important fishing boat is the dory, a small, versatile, flat-bottomed craft easily transported on shipboard and used in the entire N Atlantic.

Bibliography

For bibliography, see separate articles on various types of boats.

Boat

 

a small river rowing vessel. Boats sometimes have a sail or engine (motorboats). In modern-day water transportation, boats are used only for small-scale commercial fishing or for recreation. Ships of several naval classes are called boats, such as gunboats and U-boats.


Boat

 

(Russian, shliupka), an open vessel with a wooden, metal, or plastic hull. Boats may be propelled by oars or powered by internal-combustion engines; most rowboats also have rigging with removable masts. Boats are of several types, including naval ship’s boats, lifeboats and working boats for merchant ships, lifeboats for lake and river vessels, boats used by shore rescue stations, and sports boats. Boats range in length from less than 3 m for a sculler to more than 11.5m for the 22-oar naval launch.

What does it mean when you dream about a boat?

See Ship.

boat

[bōt]
(chemistry)
A platinum or ceramic vessel for holding a substance for analysis by combustion.
(naval architecture)
A small watercraft.

boat

1. a small vessel propelled by oars, paddle, sails, or motor for travelling, transporting goods, etc., esp one that can be carried aboard a larger vessel
2. (not in technical use) another word for ship
3. a small boat-shaped container for incense, used in some Christian churches

Boat

(dreams)
As mentioned in all relevant entries, bodies of water represent your unconscious, your emotions, and your accumulated soul experiences. Depending on the content of the dream, several different interpretations could be made. The boat in your dream could represent you and the manner you navigate through your emotions. It could symbolize the voyage of your life, an adventure and exploration of your unconscious, or a connection to the people in your dream by pointing out something that all of you have in common (“in the same boat” ). When interpreting this dream, consider the kind of voyage and the type of boat. Superstitionbased dream interpretation books say that if the voyage is calm, you should go forward with your plans. However, if it is a very stormy voyage, get ready for an emotional upset (or challenge).
References in classic literature ?
It escaped his attention, for he was glancing over the stern at something the boat had in tow.
Lizzie took her right hand from the scull it held, and touched her lips with it, and for a moment held it out lovingly towards him: then, without speaking, she resumed her rowing, as another boat of similar appearance, though in rather better trim, came out from a dark place and dropped softly alongside.
I did not stop to see what had become of the small boat, but sprang to the jib-sheet.
I looked for the boat, and, while Wolf Larsen cleared the boat- tackles, saw it lift to leeward on a big sea an not a score of feet away.
I shall never forget the picture of those two men walking up and down the bank with a tow-line, looking for their boat.
One of the most common is the sight of a couple of towers, walking briskly along, deep in an animated discussion, while the man in the boat, a hundred yards behind them, is vainly shrieking to them to stop, and making frantic signs of distress with a scull.
When the lift came, his face ground forward, and the splintery wood tore and crushed the skin from nose, lips, and chin; and, face downward, he slipped on and down to the bottom of the boat till his limp middle collapsed across the gunwale and his legs hung down outside.
This did not continue to be the case, however, for as we bore down upon the nearest net, the men to whom it belonged detached their boat and rowed slowly toward the shore.
At length they came up to the boat: but it is impossible to express their confusion when they found the boat fast aground in the creek, the tide ebbed out, and their two men gone.
For, now, the last of the fleet of ships was round the last low point we had headed; and the last green barge, straw-laden, with a brown sail, had followed; and some ballast-lighters, shaped like a child's first rude imitation of a boat, lay low in the mud; and a little squat shoal-lighthouse on open piles, stood crippled in the mud on stilts and crutches; and slimy stakes stuck out of the mud, and slimy stones stuck out of the mud, and red landmarks and tidemarks stuck out of the mud, and an old landing-stage and an old roofless building slipped into the mud, and all about us was stagnation and mud.
18th), he once more launched his bull boat, and proceeded down the Yellowstone, which inclined in an east-northeast direction.
As I brought the boat under the falls my captain, in high good- humour, leaned over, spreading his red and freckled elbows on the rail, and called down to me sarcastically, out of the depths of his cynic philosopher's beard: