circadian rhythm

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circadian rhythm:

see rhythm, biologicalrhythm, biological,
cyclic pattern of physiological changes or changes in activity in living organisms, most often synchronized with daily, monthly, or annual cyclical changes in the environment.
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circadian rhythm

[sər′kād·ē·ən ′rith·əm]
(physiology)
A self-sustained cycle of physiological changes that occurs over an approximately 24-hour cycle, generally synchronized to light-dark cycles in an organism's environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
You never needed pills to keep you awake on Indian Airlines and although the Wales v England kick-off is moving firmly towards midnight, I guess body clocks, without the Canadian tablets, will tick to meet the drama.
The mysterious body clock is simply our bodies' natural daily rhythm, which controls everything from when we wake, sleep and eat to our energy levels throughout the day.
Using a light device allows you to transition your body clock to a new time zone in small steps.
A natural method for quickly resetting the body clock uses proven light therapy techniques.
In fact, body clock has an even stronger influence on how we are because our bodies have a whole range of physiological and hormonal cycles.
This unusual schedule poses a great challenge as our internal body clock has evolved to expect a 24-hour light-dark, not a 24.
The study also indicated working up to two night shifts a week had no impact as it may not be long enough to disrupt the body clock.
In the winter they don't receive this strong light signal, and their internal body clock shifts, producing the wrong hormones at the wrong time of day.
But it becomes downright excruciating when just over 24 hours you stepped off a plane following a 14-hour flight and your body clock says it's about five in the morning.
They said the internal body clock appeared to influence the timing of strokes, with the lowest risk being when we are asleep.