bog


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bog,

very old lake without inlet or outlet that becomes acid and is gradually overgrown with a characteristic vegetation (see swampswamp,
shallow body of water in a low-lying, poorly drained depression, usually containing abundant plant growth dominated by trees, such as cypress, and high shrubs. Swamps develop in moist climates, generally in such places as low-lying coastal plains, floodplains of rivers,
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). Peat moss, or sphagnumsphagnum
or peat moss,
any species of the large and widely distributed genus Sphagnum, economically the most valuable moss. Sphagnums, the principal constituent of peat, typically grow as a floating mat on freshwater bogs.
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, grows around the edge of the open water of a bog (peatpeat,
soil material consisting of partially decomposed organic matter, found mainly in swamps and bogs in various parts of the northern temperate zone but also in some semitropical and tropical regions.
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 is obtained from old bogs) and out on the surface. With its continued growth, the moss forms a mat on the water in which other bog plants find a foothold, and humus and soil are slowly built up on the body of the water. Because of this formation bogs are sometimes treacherous (quaking bogs shake under the weight of a man) and have occasionally resulted in fatalities when a man or animal breaks through the vegetative crust. Because of their extreme acidity, bogs form a natural preservative and have been found to be a valuable repository of animals and plants of earlier times. Typical bog plants of today include, besides sphagnum, many orchids, the pitcher plant, the sundew, and the cranberry (old bogs are utilized for cranberry cultivation). Because of the reclamation of old bog lands by drainage and by their natural filling in, bogs in America are becoming rare, and with them their unique flora and fauna. One example of the latter is the bog turtle, Clemmys muhlenbergi, a tiny animal with a black, sculptured shell and orange head markings. The bog turtle has disappeared from most of its original habitat in the middle Atlantic states. Another consequence of the drainage and filling of bogs is the decreased water-holding capacity of the land, resulting in rapid run-off during rains and the increased siltation of rivers and streams.

bog

[bäg]
(ecology)
A plant community that develops and grows in areas with permanently waterlogged peat substrates. Also known as moor; quagmire.

bog

Wet, soft, and spongy ground, where the soil is composed mainly of decayed and decaying vegetable matter.

bog

Describes the undercarriage getting stuck in soft ground while taxiing. “The aircraft has bogged down in the mud.”

bog

wet spongy ground consisting of decomposing vegetation, which ultimately forms peat
References in periodicals archive ?
Joe Clancy and his nephew Brian found over 100 pounds of the ancient "bog butter" buried, as a form of refrigeration, in Ballard bog on the outskirts of Tullamore, County Offaly, as they were cutting turf.
It also hosts the Man Versus Horse Marathon and a bog snorkelling triathlon, which includes a seven and a half mile run and a 19-mile bike ride, as well as two lengths of the infamous bog.
That was until researchers at Worcester State College started poking around in the muck and found that the things living and growing in the bog may be scientific gold.
PPLA President Muhammad Ilyas Qurashi condemned the government's decision to appoint BoGs.
Loren House uses weather forecasts and years of farming know-how to decide when to drain the bogs.
One hypothesis suggests that, prior to settlement by Europeans, bog turtle wetlands were grazed by large herbivores, such as bison, that helped to maintain the open canopy and pockets of muddy substrate.
The unique chemistry of bogs helped to prevent Clonycavan Man's body from decaying, or breaking down, says Rolly Read, head of conservation at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin, where the body currently resides.
Peat is found in blanketed bogs where high rainfall occurs.
Dried peats are thought to develop from bog peats in response to a shift in hydrologic conditions brought about by natural or anthropogenic disturbance (Costin 1954).
Like its much larger counterparts--Burns Bog in the Vancouver suburb of Delta, the Lulu Island Bog in Richmond and Pitt Polder Bog to the east of the city--it includes several plant species not normally found in this biogeoclimatic zone.
The week of activities will include a free movie night, annual game night and spaghetti dinner, a festival, and of course, the popular Bog-Off where attendees can submit their best chicken bog recipes to be judged by a panel of bog experts.