bog

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bog,

very old lake without inlet or outlet that becomes acid and is gradually overgrown with a characteristic vegetation (see swampswamp,
shallow body of water in a low-lying, poorly drained depression, usually containing abundant plant growth dominated by trees, such as cypress, and high shrubs. Swamps develop in moist climates, generally in such places as low-lying coastal plains, floodplains of rivers,
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). Peat moss, or sphagnumsphagnum
or peat moss,
any species of the large and widely distributed genus Sphagnum, economically the most valuable moss. Sphagnums, the principal constituent of peat, typically grow as a floating mat on freshwater bogs.
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, grows around the edge of the open water of a bog (peatpeat,
soil material consisting of partially decomposed organic matter, usually found in swamps and bogs in various parts of the temperate zone. It is formed by the slow decay of successive layers of aquatic and semiaquatic plants, e.g., sedges, reeds, rushes, and mosses.
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 is obtained from old bogs) and out on the surface. With its continued growth, the moss forms a mat on the water in which other bog plants find a foothold, and humus and soil are slowly built up on the body of the water. Because of this formation bogs are sometimes treacherous (quaking bogs shake under the weight of a man) and have occasionally resulted in fatalities when a man or animal breaks through the vegetative crust. Because of their extreme acidity, bogs form a natural preservative and have been found to be a valuable repository of animals and plants of earlier times. Typical bog plants of today include, besides sphagnum, many orchids, the pitcher plant, the sundew, and the cranberry (old bogs are utilized for cranberry cultivation). Because of the reclamation of old bog lands by drainage and by their natural filling in, bogs in America are becoming rare, and with them their unique flora and fauna. One example of the latter is the bog turtle, Clemmys muhlenbergi, a tiny animal with a black, sculptured shell and orange head markings. The bog turtle has disappeared from most of its original habitat in the middle Atlantic states. Another consequence of the drainage and filling of bogs is the decreased water-holding capacity of the land, resulting in rapid run-off during rains and the increased siltation of rivers and streams.

bog

[bäg]
(ecology)
A plant community that develops and grows in areas with permanently waterlogged peat substrates. Also known as moor; quagmire.

bog

Wet, soft, and spongy ground, where the soil is composed mainly of decayed and decaying vegetable matter.

bog

Describes the undercarriage getting stuck in soft ground while taxiing. “The aircraft has bogged down in the mud.”

bog

wet spongy ground consisting of decomposing vegetation, which ultimately forms peat
References in periodicals archive ?
Dried peats are widespread throughout the Alps; thus, further studies of the properties of these soils could improve our understanding of the processes involved in the role of bogs in the hydrology and biodiversity of these high mountain catchments and could support management of the area for maximum water yield and conservation.
Ignorance and avarice, the hubris exhibited by members of a modernist, capitalist society, the triumph of engineers, planners, and brute force technologies conspired, in short order, to all but destroy an area now regarded, with other bogs and wetlands, as fulfilling important ecological services.
In well-established bogs, tamarack populations may be found in associations with Sphagnum mosses, various sedges, carnivorous plants, ericaceous shrubs, and a few species of deciduous and evergreen trees Larsen 1982; Dennison and Berry 1993).
istthp The directive has met fierce resistance on some of the bogs, notwithstanding a compensation and alternative bog scheme introduced by the Government.
It also tells experts that the formation of peat at these two bogs has been more or less continuous since the last ice age.
Peat bogs consist of waterlogged soil that is made up of partially decomposed vegetation such as sphagnum moss.
But this ruins the bogs as they need to be waterlogged so that peat can continue to form and bog plants can grow.
A floating mat, typical of bogs, can rise and fall with changing water-levels, keeping the substrate saturated, but not covered with standing water.
The goal is to achieve the greatest wetland functions and values, along with optimum bog turtle habitat, on every acre enrolled in the program.
Application of the filtration laws for water movement modelling in the acrotelm provides a possibility of adequate reflection of its anomalous properties and water regime in raised bogs.
Healthy peat bogs are not only great for wildlife, but they offer many wider benefits, including soaking up rainfall to prevent flooding downstream, providing clean drinking water and storing carbon to prevent climate change.
The Barroughter and Clonmoylan Bog Action Group claimed the Emergency Response Unit was involved in the operation, but a Garda spokesman was unable to confirm this.