Bohemianism

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Bohemianism

Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, The
Gertrude Stein’s memoir of Paris’ Bohemia. [Am. Lit.: Stein The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas in Benét, 66]
Bloomsbury
section of London where, in the first half of the 20th century, a group of artists and intellectuals frequently congregated. [Br. Culture: Benét, 115]
Greenwich Village
area of southern Manhattan long identified with artists and writers. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Haight-Ashbury
neighborhood in San Francisco associated with beatnicks and “flower people” in the 1960s. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Latin Quarter
section of Paris on left bank of the Seine; home of students, artists, and writers. [Fr. Culture: EB, VI: 71–72]
Olenska, Countess Ellen
often considers divorce; likes “unacceptable” people. [Am. Lit.: The Age of Innocence]
SoHo
bohemian neighborhood So(uth of) Ho(uston Street), New York City. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
The book went through the standard peer review process at Lehigh University Press, but with the aim of being made available under a creative commons license at the place where it was most likely to be found by readers interested in the history of Pfaff and the bohemians who frequented his business.
The mythic lore surrounding the Bohemian conclaves is in large part a self-created mystique, provoked--perhaps deliberately--by the extreme secrecy that shrouds these gatherings in mystery.
Building on his important work in Anne's Bohemia, as well as Paul Strohm's Hochon's Arrow and David Wallace's Chaucerian Polity, Thomas offers a detailed account of the artistic and literary inclinations of Bohemian royalty, from the Gothic piety of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV, which shaped the tastes of his English son-in-law, to the Kunstkammer of another Holy Roman Emperor, Rudolf II.
The man with the spangled jacket represents Dunbar's take on the dandy, the best-publicized social type of the European bohemian during the 1890s and a direct descendant of Baudelaire's flaneur, the power-strolling bohemian paradigm who scouted and classified the commercial mysteries of the metropolis for the 1840s, '50s, and '60s.
Suggested retail for the Bohemian Collection rugs is $1,080 for a 6-by-9.
Many important French novels of the nineteenth century feature bohemian characters (Balzac's Illusions perdues, Flaubert's L'Education sentimentale), but none inspired readers to sample bohemian life for themselves to the extent that Murger's work did.
But as Nicholson, granddaughter of famous Bohemian Vanessa Bell, reveals, the reality was somewhat different.
Youth in Revolutionary Russia: Enthusiasts, Bohemians, Delinquents.
Bobos are thus avid consumers (a bourgeois trait), but want their consumption to remain inconspicuous, lest they betray themselves as rich vulgarians (a bohemian trait).
The multicultural urban bohemian flavor of this novel--featuring young people all in the early and sometimes chaotic phases of finding their way artistically and vocationally, while also exploring and understanding his or her own personal and sexual identity--suggests to me, as I read it today, a quiet, well-crafted, more personal literary forerunner of the Broadway musical Rent (itself based on the opera La Boheme).
Her bohemian lifestyle is part of the same system that underwrites free markets, consumerism, and tolerance for all sorts of offensive speech and alternative lifestyles.