boiler steel

boiler steel

[′bȯil·ər ‚stēl]
(computer science)

boiler steel

A medium-hardness steel which is rolled into plates 0.25 in. (0.6 cm) to 1.5 in. (3.8 cm) thick; used in fabricating boilers.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the light of the global market, the increase of overseas demand for steel structure in future is reflected in the following several aspects: the first one is the acceleration of the conventionally-fired power plant construction, which means that steel consumption for main plants and boiler steel frame (including nuclear power plants and wind power generation) will increase; the second is the bridges in traffic engineering will increase.
For buildings, the delivery will include a minimum of boiler steel structures.
The influence of the long-term operation on tensile properties of boiler steels has been investigated in [1-8].
In order to analyse the applicability of the SP testing technique for the determination of tensile strength and yield strength of some boiler steels, SP tests and conventional tensile tests were performed at room temperature.
On the basis of experience with common boiler steels it was found [22] that there is no functional relationship between yield strength and tensile strength (Fig.
A detailed investigation on high-temperature corrosion of Russian boiler steels under the influence of oil shale ash was carried out at Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn University of Technology (TED TUT) during the last four decades [1].
Laboratory corrosion tests of boiler steels were carried out in accordance with standard techniques [8, 9].
The results of laboratory and industrial corrosion tests of various boiler steels and pearlitic steel 12X1M[PHI] with coating containing 73% Ni and 16% Cr have shown that the resistance of superheater tubes to chlorine corrosion depends on the content of alloying elements as well as on the particular element content ratio.