Boletus

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Boletus

 

any of a number of tubular basidial mushrooms of the genus Boletus (Suillus). The best known are B. granulatus, which lacks a ring on the stem, and B. luteus and B. grevillei, which have rings. They are widespread in coniferous forests, growing in both summer and fall. Boletuses are usually stewed or fried, and frequently preserved (pickled).

References in periodicals archive ?
He was well ahead of King Bolete, Polarisation and Martiniquaise at Ascot.
Bollag's paternal grandfather, who lived in Herrliberg near Zurich, would take the children mushroom hunting for chanterelles and boletes.
All are edible, although none is quite as tasty as the Edible Bolete, the Cep of French cooking or Porcini of Italian, which is always supposed to resemble a penny bun.
To be honest, these days I often just take a good mushroom guide on a walk and enjoy identifying different varieties; the only one's I am confident enough to eat are the Orange Birch Boletes and the Porcinis.
King boletes (boletus edulis) or porcini can emerge now as well in spots favored by chanterelles.
You can find anything from the small discreet varieties to the showy chanterelles and boletes.
Tea is virtually the only dietary source of theanine, apart from the edible bay boletes mushroom, which explains why sometimes only tea will do.
Coverage includes edible species of new York, such as the boletes, chanterelles and their allies, coral fungi, gilled mushrooms, giant puffballs, hypomyces, morels, polypores and tooth fungi; and the inedible and poisonous species amongst the boletes, false morels and gilled.
Because certain mushrooms have a symbiotic relationship with certain types of trees, you are more likely to find, for example, bay boletes (Xerocomus badius) under pines, tacky-green russules (Russula aeruginea) tinder beeches, or larch boletes (Suillus grevillei) under latches.
pubescens and several members of Boletes and members of Russulaceae are of temperate origin while the impact of the tropical and Mexican (South American) species are obvious in the increasing numbers of Pleurotus, Panus, Lentinus and allied species.
The only edible ones I have learned to identify well enough to pick confidently are Chanterelles, Orange Birch Boletes, Porcini and Parasols.