bolt

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bolt

1. an arrow, esp for a crossbow
2. Mechanical engineering short for expansion bolt

Bolt

Robert (Oxton). 1924--95, British playwright. His plays include A Man for All Seasons (1960) and he also wrote a number of screenplays

Bolt

A rod or pin, with a permanent head on one end, that holds parts of a building or structure together.

bolt

[bōlt]
(design engineering)
A rod, usually of metal, with a square, round, or hexagonal head at one end and a screw thread on the other, used to fasten objects together.
(forestry)
A short section of tree trunk.
(materials)
In veneer production, a short log of a length suitable for peeling on a lathe.
(mining engineering)
(ordnance)
The sliding part in a breechloading weapon that pushes a cartridge into position and holds it there as the gun is fired.
(textiles)
The entire length of cloth from a loom.

bolt

bolts, 1
1. A metallic pin or rod having a head at one end and an external thread on the other for screwing up a nut; used for holding members or parts of members together.
2. A short section cut from a tree trunk.
3. A short log from which veneer is peeled.
References in periodicals archive ?
sales of the Bolt should climb further over the next few months
In addition to this connection test, evaluation of dowel bearing strength of LVL members and bending test of bolts and dowel bearing strength of the LVL members.
Such close bolt tolerance offers the gun owner a feature whereby a barrel from one rifle can be used on another rifle if the cartridge headspace is correct.
Just as the words trousers and pants can be used interchangeably, I believe the same is true with bolts and arrows.
Strain gauges are adhered on three bolts implying the need of parallel following of four signals.
Now designers use PMT bolts in their search for lighter cars.
As can be imagined, there were no standardized threads, even on bolts of the same size.
I believe it best you run the bolt again if you hit the target, as the target may just get "well" again (however temporarily), stand up and bolt off, so to speak, so you should be ready to shoot again--and you will need to run the bolt to do so.
If the bolt spins as you turn the nut and doesn't loosen, or the bolt just spins, go to Option 2.
The bolts were loaded in axial tension in two ways; using a torque wrench (experiment-1) and a tensile tester (experiment-2).
It might be argued that a bolt action is nothing more than an in-line, and to a point it is.