bolt

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bolt

1. an arrow, esp for a crossbow
2. Mechanical engineering short for expansion bolt

Bolt

Robert (Oxton). 1924--95, British playwright. His plays include A Man for All Seasons (1960) and he also wrote a number of screenplays

Bolt

A rod or pin, with a permanent head on one end, that holds parts of a building or structure together.

bolt

[bōlt]
(design engineering)
A rod, usually of metal, with a square, round, or hexagonal head at one end and a screw thread on the other, used to fasten objects together.
(forestry)
A short section of tree trunk.
(materials)
In veneer production, a short log of a length suitable for peeling on a lathe.
(mining engineering)
(ordnance)
The sliding part in a breechloading weapon that pushes a cartridge into position and holds it there as the gun is fired.
(textiles)
The entire length of cloth from a loom.

bolt

bolts, 1
1. A metallic pin or rod having a head at one end and an external thread on the other for screwing up a nut; used for holding members or parts of members together.
2. A short section cut from a tree trunk.
3. A short log from which veneer is peeled.
References in classic literature ?
A shout burst from his comrades as they watched the swift and lofty flight of the heavy bolt.
cried a Gascon loudly, and a comrade came running with waving arms to say that the bolt had pitched eight paces beyond the mark of the five hundred.
I pray you to speed a bolt against yonder shield with all your force.
Long were the faces of the Englishmen and broad the laugh of the crossbowmen as the heavy mantlet was carried towards them, for there in the centre was the thick Brabant bolt driven deeply into the wood, while there was neither sign nor trace of the cloth-yard shaft.
Bellying closer to the ground, Ben Bolt advanced upon him, creeping slowly like a cat stalking a mouse.
Ever Ben Bolt leaped to retaliate, but was thrown by the ten men tailed on to the rope, and, each time, even as he struck the floor on his side, Mulcachy was upon him, pounding, smashing, jabbing.
Ben Bolt, jungle-born and jungle-reared, was to be compelled to sit in the chair in ludicrous and tragic imitation of man-creatures.
Stepping to a near safe distance, he lashed Ben Bolt on the nose.
Snarling, struggling, choking, in a fresh madness of terror at this new outrage, Ben Bolt was slowly hoisted by his neck up from the floor, until, quite clear of it, whirling, squirming, battling, suspended by his neck like a man being hanged, his wind was shut off and he began to suffocate.
His helpless body guided thus by the tail, his chest jabbed by the iron fork in Mulcachy's hands, the rope was suddenly lowered, and Ben Bolt, with swimming brain, found himself seated in the chair.
And again, struggling frantically as the tightening collar shut off his wind, Ben Bolt was slowly lifted into the air.
Not on that first day, nor on the second, nor on the third, did the requisite something really break inside Ben Bolt.