bomb load

bomb load

[′bäm ‚lōd]
(ordnance)
The weight or number of bombs carried by an aircraft.
The bomb or bombs carried.
References in periodicals archive ?
On November 10, 1939, two months after Germany's invasion of Poland, Arnold initiated the VLR project to develop a four-engine bomber superior in range, speed, and bomb load to the B-17 and B-24.
303 machine-guns in a nose mount, mid-upper and tail turrets, and a 13,000 pound bomb load.
Moreover, during the course of the war, the Bugs capabilities in terms of speed, range, and bomb load seemed increasingly inadequate as the capabilities of standard combat aircraft increased.
The aircraft failed shortly after take off, forcing Munro to "belly land" the plane and its bomb load near Empingham just minutes later.
The Germans also failed to develop an aircraft with significant bomb load and a powerful fixed forward-firing armament along the lines of the Douglas A-20, Douglas A-26, Martin B-26 and North American B-25.
Capable of carrying half the bomb load of a B-17, the P-47 Thunderbolts of (the) Ninth Air Force inflicted significant damage on enemy ground forces throughout the Normandy campaign.
The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 was a single-seat, single-engine multi-role fighter-bomber, capable of carrying a larger bomb load than its counterpart the Messerschmitt Bf109.
The pilots conducted the emergency jettison because they were low on fuel and could not land with their bomb load, the navy said.
He also says the wings appear to be too small to carry the weight of the aircraft and a bomb load.
For optimum use against a target, the GBU-28 also requires a clear line of sight, which means that the plane has to be flying low and relatively slowly, making the fighters more vulnerable to ground defenses, particularly with their maneuverability limited due to the bomb load.
The veteran staff sergeant recalls both aircraft fondly, saying what the B-17 lacked in speed and bomb load compared to the B-24, it made up for in toughness.