bomb load

bomb load

[′bäm ‚lōd]
(ordnance)
The weight or number of bombs carried by an aircraft.
The bomb or bombs carried.
References in periodicals archive ?
This interior could transform into anything; an aeroplane, a tank, a submarine or spaceship, and we would squabble for control of the upside-down steering wheel to pilot our imaginary craft, swinging it wildly from side to side and flicking switches on the dashboard to launch torpedoes, drop our bomb load, or fire deadly laser beams.
Only once that I had any problem and there was a wing commander who got very angry about a report that I had one of his people dropping their bomb load way off target.
Of the Hampden debacle, Steve, from Shirley, says: "It was presumably hoped that, as these aircraft would not be carrying their normal bomb load, their performance would be adequate for the task.
The Germans had more aircraft overall, but these were in squadrons of out-dated, virtually obsolete twin-engined bombers that were poorly armed and could only carry a small bomb load or Stuka dive bombers - good at dive bombing but they were slow and, again, with poor defensive armament, making them easy prey.
Tu-22 flights from Iran means less fuel and a bigger bomb load," he said, when compared with flying the planes a much longer distance from Russia.
With a crew of six, the XB-21 had a top speed of 220 mph and could carry a bomb load of 2,200 pound a distance of 1,900 miles.
Of the Hampden debacle, Steve, from Shirley, said: "It was presumably hoped that, as these aircraft would not be carrying their normal bomb load, their performance would be adequate for the task.
The aircraft failed shortly after take off, forcing Munro to "belly land" the plane and its bomb load near Empingham just minutes later.
In order to increase their bomb load, the planes were stripped of all guns except for those in the tail section.
Capable of carrying half the bomb load of a B-17, the P-47 Thunderbolts of (the) Ninth Air Force inflicted significant damage on enemy ground forces throughout the Normandy campaign.
The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 was a single-seat, single-engine multi-role fighter-bomber, capable of carrying a larger bomb load than its counterpart the Messerschmitt Bf109.
The pilots conducted the emergency jettison because they were low on fuel and could not land with their bomb load, the Navy said.