bomb shelter


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bomb shelter

[′bäm ‚shel·tər]
(civil engineering)
A bomb-proof structure for protection of people.
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of people still know him as the guy with the business in a bomb shelter, Butler said, even though his business has grown significantly since its beginnings, when he spent much of his time educating customers about his services.
Now it's up to us to start to locate and find these fallout and bomb shelters and make preparations and plans to utilize them in the event that people need to take shelter because of a terrorist attack or man-made event.
If nighttime rocket attacks were going to be a common occurrence, then a miniature bomb shelter is definitely where I wanted to rest my head.
I am not sure if the facility was ever used, but it looks like the bomb shelter could sustain life for 50 people for at least 30 days.
Embunkered, terrorized by his own age, Sam awaits closure helplessly, much like a suburban family encrypted in a backyard bomb shelter.
11, Benjamin Domenec's popular blog, "The Transom," featured a tour of a luxury bomb shelter in a secret location.
During the hearing, an Israeli state attorney suggested lying on the ground as an alternative to a bomb shelter, " Bomb shelters are a last resort from a security perspective.
SIR - I WRITE this letter as I sit in my hotel in Tel Aviv next to the bomb shelter.
The Coundon resident, now 76, was sitting where three-year-old Delphine was in a bomb shelter, but they swapped places when Elma started crying.
The bunker was built as a bomb shelter in 1943; in the Cold War '70s, it was expanded into a nuclear-safe civil defense center.
Fifth Column' referred to saboteurs and rumour-mongers) Population exceeds bomb shelter places SPEAKING of local air raid shelter accommodation at Thornaby Council the Mayor, Alderman H Dacre, announced that out of a population in the town of 21,750, no fewer than 17,241 persons had been provided for.
Among the finds are a massive underground bomb shelter in El Monte now used to store new cars, and storage rooms full of old rations and guidebooks that sound almost quaint today in their tips for nuclear-war survivors.