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boomerang

(bo͞o`mərăng'), special form of throwing stick, used mainly by the aborigines of Australia. Other forms of throwing sticks were used by the peoples of ancient Egypt, Ethiopia, and India and by the indigenous peoples of the SW United States. The boomerang is sickle-shaped with arms slightly curved in opposite directions as in a propeller. The trajectory of a boomerang is usually an arc, but in some cases it is a full circle. The boomerang of the Australian aborigines (from whom the name is derived) is made in two types. The smaller boomerang, 12 to 30 in. (30 to 75 cm) long, is used only for sport and is thrown so that it returns to the thrower. The larger war boomerang is 24 to 36 in. (60 to 90 cm) long and does not return; it is used for hunting and warfare.

Boomerang

(pop culture)
The freelance assassin known as Boomerang was introduced in an Incredible Hulk feature story in Tales to Astonish #81 (1966), scripted by Stan Lee and penciled by Jack Kirby, as major league baseball pitcher “Fred” (he later was given the last name Myers). Although he had an extraordinary arm, Myers was suspended from the league for accepting bribes. Washed up and bitter, he eventually wandered into the Secret Empire, the subversive criminal organization in which he became a special operative code-named Boomerang. When the Secret Empire disbanded, Boomerang returned to his native Australia, where he honed his natural gift of throwing. As a freelance assassin equipped with weaponry financed by multimillionaire Justin Hammer, Boomerang has primarily fought Spider-Man, although he has taken aim at the Hulk, Iron Fist, Nick Fury, Shang-Chi, the Black Widow, Hawkeye, and the Defenders. He has freelanced for the Kingpin, but has also been affiliated with the Jack O'Lantern–founded team, the Sinister Syndicate (which also included Rhino, Beetle, Hydro- Man, and Speed Demon), and has allied himself with other Marvel villains, such as Viper II, Blizzard II, Silver Samurai, Blacklash, and Hammerhead. The expert marksman doesn't possess any superpowers to speak of, but his aim is dead on. His primary weapons are his trademark boomerangs, each of which is outfitted for a special purpose: “shatterangs” detonate on impact with explosive power; “gasarangs” release highly concentrated tear gas; “razorangs” slice through almost any material; and “screamerangs” produce a sonic blast. Boomerang can “fly” for several hours at moderate speed thanks to his mentally controlled high-powered boot-jets. Boomerang's contemporary appearances include moments in Marvel Knights: Spider-Man (2005) as a member of Green Goblin's Sinister Twelve. In television animation, Boomerang appeared in a “Hulk” episode of The Marvel Super- Heroes series (1966) and in the FOX Kids Avengers series (1999–2000).

Boomerang

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A boomerang is a configuration resembling a yod but involving a fourth planet directly opposed to the “action planet” at the tip of the yod. In a yod, two planets form a sextile (60°) aspect and both in turn form a quincunx (150°) aspect with a third planet. If lines were drawn to the center of the horoscope from all three planets, the resulting pattern would look like a capital Y. The planet at the bottom tip of the Y is said to be the action planet because its house placement is where the action takes place when the configuration is activated by a transit or a progression. The interpretation often given to a yod in a natal chart is that it indicates a life that proceeds along in a certain pattern for a period of time until the established pattern is abruptly interrupted and the native is forced to proceed in a new direction, though the new direction is one for which the person had actually been preparing for some time. A completely unanticipated promotion in one’s chosen profession, for example, might be brought about by an activated yod configuration.

When a fourth planet is involved in a yod so that it forms an opposition (180°) aspect to the action planet and semisextile (30°) aspects to the remaining two planets, the resulting formation is called a boomerang, a designation coined by Joan McEvers. In a boomerang, the situation anticipated at the point of the action planet “boomerangs” when the configuration is activated. One example McEvers uses in her explanation of the boomerang is Ralph Waldo Emerson, who had such a configuration in his natal chart and who, when fortune placed the 26-year-old minister in the pulpit of Boston’s Old North Church, found himself in a situation with which his non-conformist temperament had difficulty coping. He was eventually forced to leave the ministry. Thus, Emerson’s opportunity “boomeranged.”

Sources:

Escobar, Thyrza. Side Lights of Astrology. 3d ed. Hollywood, CA: Golden Seal Research, 1971.
McEvers, Joan. “The Boomerang: A New Configuration.” In Astrology: Old Theme, New Thoughts. Edited by Marion D. March and Joan McEvers. San Diego: Astro Computing Services, 1984.

Boomerang

 

a type of wooden throwing stick for combat and hunting, widely used among many Australian tribes. Sticks resembling the boomerang have also been found in ancient Egypt, southern India, Southeast Asia, and Mexico. The boomerangs known to the Australians were of the returning type and were capable of describing complex paths, closed figure eights, and so on, in flight. A returning boomerang is a curved plate that forms two vanes of unequal length; the lower surface is flat, and the upper surface is convex (its cross-section is similar to that of an airplane wing). The flight dynamics of a boomerang that is simultaneously in forward and rotational motion is very complex: the comparatively rapid rotation of the boomerang in the air creates an aerodynamic moment that affects the boomerang like a rotating gyroscope and continually deflects it from the direction of flight. The line of flight also depends on the direction of the wind and the skill of the thrower.

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