boot

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Related to boots: cowboy boots

boot

1. an enclosed compartment of a car for holding luggage, etc., usually at the rear
2. a protective covering over a mechanical device, such as a rubber sheath protecting a coupling joining two shafts
3. US and Canadian a rubber patch used to repair a puncture in a tyre
4. a protective covering for the lower leg of a horse
5. Computing short for bootstrap

boot

[büt]
(computer science)
To load the operating system into a computer after it has been switched on; usually applied to small computers.
(electricity)
A protective covering over any portion of a cable, wire, or connector.
(mining engineering)
A projecting portion of a reinforced concrete beam acting as a corbel to support the facing material, such as brick or stone.
The lower end of a bucket elevator.
(petroleum engineering)

Boot

[büt]
(astronomy)

boot

The flange and metal casing around a pipe that passes through a roof.

boot

boot
A flexible tubing bonded to the leading edge of wings, fins, elevators, and other aircraft surfaces to break up ice. These are inflated and deflated in a pulsating fashion. Each inflation and deflation results in the breaking up of ice that may have formed and is allowed to be swept away. Boots are generally provided on the leading edges of the mainplane, the tailplane, and the fin.

boot

boot

Causing the computer to start executing instructions. PCs and Macs contain built-in instructions in a ROM or flash memory chip that are automatically executed on startup. These instructions search for the operating system, load it and pass control to it. Starting up a large computer may require more button pushing and keyboard input.

Put Your Boots On!
The term comes from "bootstrap." Since bootstraps help you get your boots on, booting the computer helps it get its first instructions. The term is often used erroneously for application software. For example, you might hear someone say "let's boot Excel," whereas the correct usage is "launch Excel" or "load Excel." See cold boot, warm boot, clean boot, boot loader and first boot sequence.


You Need Help to Get Started
System Commander lets you install up to 100 different operating systems on your PC. On startup, this menu lets you choose your OS. (Screen shot courtesy of V Communications, Inc., www.v-com.com)





All the Boots You'll Ever Need
System Commander lets you install up to 100 different operating systems on your PC. On startup, this menu lets you choose your OS. (Screen shot courtesy of V Communications, Inc., www.v-com.com)
References in classic literature ?
A moment was allowed for the first thrill to subside, then Hugo, the villain, stalked in with a clanking sword at his side, a slouching hat, black beard, mysterious cloak, and the boots.
Her stockings and boots and well fitting gloves had worked marvels in her bearing--had given her a feeling of assurance, a sense of belonging to the well-dressed multitude.
But it was of funereal black cloth, and although relieved at one extremity by a pair of high riding boots, in which his too short trousers were tucked, and at the other by a tall white hat, and cravat of aggressive yellow, the effect was depressing.
For an hour that magician went on shuffling and pulling off boots till he had shed as many as twenty-five pair, and I was hovering on the verge of lunacy.
You see, I had had my boots off, to unswell my feet, and just then I took up one of them to put it on, and I catched a glimpse of the heel-bottom, and it just took my breath away.
Young Jerry, dress yourself, my boy, and while I clean my boots keep a eye upon your mother now and then, and if you see any signs of more flopping, give me a call.
But she only fell in a sitting posture on the ground, and began to pull at her boots, looking up at him with a crying face as if the boots hurt her.
Now he threw away all the silver with which he had filled his pockets and knapsack, and filled them with gold instead--yes, all his pockets, his knapsack, cap and boots even, so that he could hardly walk.
In any case, therefore, I should have needed boots to maintain my name and reputation; to both of which my ragged footgear would otherwise have spelled ruin.
But I hope that to lose one of your boots is not part of the ordinary routine of life over here.
She took off the thick boots in which she had walked thus far, put on her pretty thin ones of patent leather, and, stuffing the former into the hedge by the gatepost where she might readily find them again, descended the hill; the freshness of colour she had derived from the keen air thinning away in spite of her as she drew near the parsonage.
If he wears his light suit and takes the stick it comes on to rain, and he reaches the house in a damp and muddy condition and spends the evening trying to hide his boots.