bootstrap

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Related to bootstraps: pull yourself up by your bootstraps, pull up by bootstraps

bootstrap

[′büt‚strap]
(computer science)
The procedures for making a computer or a program function through its own actions.
(engineering)
A technique or device designed to bring itself into a desired state by means of its own action.

bootstrap

(operating system, compiler)
To load and initialise the operating system on a computer. Normally abbreviated to "boot". From the curious expression "to pull oneself up by one's bootstraps", one of the legendary feats of Baron von Munchhausen. The bootstrap loader is the program that runs on the computer before any (normal) program can run. Derived terms include reboot, cold boot, warm boot, soft boot and hard boot.

The term also applies to the use of a compiler to compile itself. The usual process is to write an interpreter for a language, L, in some other existing language. The compiler is then written in L and the interpreter is used to run it. This produces an executable for compiling programs in L from the source of the compiler in L. This technique is often used to verify the correctness of a compiler. It was first used in the LISP community.

See also My Favourite Toy Language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Parametric and nonparametric bootstrap confidence intervals for the complete and censored data sets were estimated for the 0.
Differences in the Usage of Bootstrap Financing Among Technology-Based versus Nontechnology-Based Firms.
The term "bootstrap" -- derived from the old saying about pulling yourself up by your own bootstraps -- reflects the fact that the one available sample gives rise to all the others, Efron says.
Fiber Deployment in Latin America, 2000-2006: From Buildout to Bandwidth, a new report from KMI reveals that Latin America is emerging from a period of pulling itself up by its telecom bootstraps.
California State University, Northridge, has made a remarkable comeback from the $42 billion earthquake in the San Fernando Valley, largely by pulling itself up from its own bootstraps.