bore

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bore,

inrush of water that advances upstream with a wavelike front, caused by the progress of incoming tide from a wide-mouthed bay into its narrower portion. The tidal movement tends to be retarded by friction as it reaches the shallower water and meets the river current; it therefore piles up and forms a low wall of water that moves upstream with considerable force and velocity as the tide continues to rise. In the mouth of the Amazon River a tidal bore known locally as the pororoca occurs every spring tide. It has a wall of water from 5 to 15 ft (1.5–4.6 m) high and advances at a speed of from 10 to 15 mi (16–24 km) per hr. The highest recorded bore (15 ft/4.6 m) is found in the Fuchun River near Hangzhou, China. Bores are found also in the Bay of Fundy, in Solway Firth, in the Severn, Seine, and Hugli rivers, and in Hangzhou Bay.

bore

[bȯr]
(design engineering)
Inside diameter of a pipe or tube.
(mechanical engineering)
The diameter of a piston-cylinder mechanism as found in reciprocating engines, pumps, and compressors.
To penetrate or pierce with a rotary tool.
To machine a workpiece to increase the size of an existing hole in it.
(mining engineering)
A tunnel under construction.
To cut or drill a hole for blasting, water infusion, exploration, or water or firedamp drainage.
(oceanography)
A high, breaking wave of water, advancing rapidly up an estuary. Also known as eager; mascaret; tidal bore.
A submarine sand ridge, in very shallow water, whose crest may rise to intertidal level.
(ordnance)
The interior of a gun barrel or tube.

bore

1. The inside diameter of a pipe, valve, or other fitting.
2. The circular hole made by boring.

bore

The inside diameter of the cylinder of a reciprocating engine.

bore

1
a. a circular hole in a material produced by drilling, turning, or drawing
b. the diameter of such a hole

bore

2
a high steep-fronted wave moving up a narrow estuary, caused by the tide
References in classic literature ?
Dag Daughtry exulted; repeating what he had expressed in the hold, as he bored the last barrel, listened to the good water gurgling away into the bilge, and chuckled over his discovery of the Ancient Mariner on the same lay as his own.
The cocktail was a prod, a spur, a kick, to my jaded mind and bored spirits.
Possibly the people who are not of our set are even more bored; but we--I certainly--are not happy, but awfully, awfully bored.
One has but to look at you and one sees, here's a woman who may be happy or unhappy, but isn't bored.
I told you long ago," he said, turning to Liza Merkalova, "that if you don't want to be bored, you mustn't think you're going to be bored.
YAWN OFFER It's a weekly highlight, although the farmers probably are bored by it.
BEING bored could be bad for your health, a medical study has revealed.
London, July 20 (ANI): A new study suggests that British people, on average, spend over two years of their lives bored to tears.
Ground conditions at 60 feet were hard and choppy, so the operator bored down to 80 feet with little improvement.
David Barbera, vice president of Barbco, estimates average lengths of auger bored installations has reached a maximum of 400 feet and are continuing to increase.