boron-10


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boron-10

[′bȯ‚rän ′ten]
(nuclear physics)
A nonradioactive isotope of boron with a mass number of 10; it is a good absorber for slow neutrons, simultaneously emitting high-energy alpha particles, and is used as a radiation shield in Geiger counters.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A[cedilla] Implement new primary circuit boron-10 concentration monitoring points
BNCT treatment produces radiation inside a tumor using boron-10 and thermal neutrons.
The Brightsen Model predicts that the large cross section of Boron-10 (as opposed to the small cross section of Boron-11) results from the presence of a stable and independent nucleon cluster structure [PNP], which coexists with two [NP] and one [NPN] clusters that maintain very small cross sections.
With the use of Boron-10 coated collimators one can reduce this component considerably.
Collisions of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen nuclei with high-speed protons would produce twice the measured ratio of boron to beryllium and only half the ratio of the isotope boron-11 to boron-10, a sibling with one fewer neutron.
Federman of the University of Toledo in Ohio and his colleagues, including Lambert, used the Goddard spectrograph to measure the relative abundances of boron-10 and boron-11 along the line of sight to three stars in the nearby interstellar medium.
The researchers conclude that the interstellar medium in Earth's neighborhood contains four times as much boron-11 as boron-10.
The successful treatment of cancer by BNCT, however, requires selective concentration of boron-10 within malignant tumors, and the major obstacle to this therapy in the past has been the difficulty in targeting sufficient quantities of boron-containing drug to the cancerous cells.
In order to guarantee efficient neutron detectors at the future ESS facility, and avoid dependence on helium-3, whose production is extremely limited, and consequently very expensive, the Neutron Detector Group at ESS and scientists at the Thin Film Physics Division at Linkoping University launched an extensive R&D work aimed at enabling the use of enriched thin films of boron-10 carbide for ESS' detector systems, instead of using helium-3.
The collisions would produce twice the measured ratio of boron to beryllium and only half the observed abundance of boron-11 to boron-10.
Kahl and his colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco, deeloped the molecular "package bomb" as a 20-sided solid with one atom of boron-10 -- a neutron-absorbing isotope of boron--at each of the molecule's 12 corners.