boss

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boss

1 Informal
Chiefly US a professional politician who controls a party machine or political organization, often using devious or illegal methods

boss

2
1. Biology any of various protuberances or swellings in plants and animals
2. 
a. an area of increased thickness, usually cylindrical, that strengthens or provides room for a locating device on a shaft, hub of a wheel, etc
b. a similar projection around a hole in a casting or fabricated component
3. an exposed rounded mass of igneous or metamorphic rock, esp the uppermost part of an underlying batholith

Boss

A projecting ornament, usually richly carved and placed at the intersection of ribs, groins, beams, or at the termination of a molding.

Boss

 

(1) Proprietor, entrepreneur.

(2) In the USA this term is also used for persons who head the apparatus of the Republican and Democratic parties in states and cities. Acting in the interests of monopolies, bosses frequently resort to bribes, threats, and blackmail during election campaigns in order to ensure the victory of candidates suitable to them.

What does it mean when you dream about your boss?

Dreaming of one’s boss may indicate over involvement with work. Alternatively, it may represent a parental figure—the father if the boss is a man, and the mother if the boss is a woman.

boss

[bȯs]
(design engineering)
Protuberance on a cast metal or plastic part to add strength, facilitate assembly, provide for fastenings, or so forth.
(geology)
A large, irregular mass of crystalline igneous rock that formed some distance below the surface but is now exposed by denudation.
(naval architecture)

boss

boss, 1
1. A projecting, usually richly carved ornament placed at the intersection of ribs, groins, beams, etc., or at the termination of a molding.
2. In masonry, a roughly shaped stone set to project for carving in place.
3. To hammer sheet metal to conform to an irregular surface.
4. A protuberance on a pipe, fitting, or part designed to add strength, to facilitate alignment during assembly, to provide for fastenings, etc.

BOSS

Bridgport Operating System Software. A derivative of the ISO 1054 numerical machine control language for milling, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under such circumstances, the importance of a boss is magnified, with the potential for bad bosses to make things substantially worse and for good bosses to save the day.
What bosses think: No pride in yourself and unsuitable dress sense, therefore no pride in your work.
But the engaging and practical Good Boss, Bad Boss aims to save all these bad bosses from themselves and make the good bosses even better by outlining all the defining features that make a boss great.
Bosses may have earned the right to be called such, taking into consideration the number of years and breadth of experience; however, if he or she is not an effective team player, the effort to succeed becomes futile.
Some bosses are readers, meaning they prefer to receive information in written form.
Bosses differ in their preferred communication style.
But, you may be wondering, how would anything get done without bosses and Bossism?
UK bosses fared poorly in a survey of 340 people conducted by Jet UK, one of the UK's leading manufacturers of office products.
However, transport bosses are more likely to be tyrants who put profit before people.
Bosses from the IT and telecoms industries are 10 times more likely to adopt a David Brent-style of management and try to be an entertainer, than media bosses, who tend to be seen as pushovers and fall into the pussycat category.
Surprisingly, victims of workplace bullying rarely file complaints against their bosses, which is one reason for the dearth of data on the subject.
His bosses at the Bureau of Sanitation thought they finally had an ironclad case for firing him.