bottomland

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bottomland

[′bäd·əm‚land]
(geology)
A lowland formed by alluvial deposit about a lake basin or a stream.
References in periodicals archive ?
Illinois deer retreat to dry bottomlands or dense upland cover during inclement winter weather.
Patterson and Clark 1988); yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera; Patterson and Clark 1992); red pine (Pinus resinosa), northern red oak (Quercus rubra), and yellow poplar (Patterson and Wiant 1993); bottomland hardwoods (Leahart et al.
Due to the lack of drainage and the dominance of sedimentary substrates, the soils of the bottomlands are fine in texture and the lower plots can have a high salinity.
Tree density and recruitment has declined since 1972 in the RAP bottomlands (S.
Floodplain bottomlands often have diverse topographies consisting of repeated ridges, swales and meandering scrolls (Leopold et al.
Stuart indicated collecting it from sandy bottomland (along Wea Creek), an unusual habitat for the species.
State and federal wildlife agencies have invested decades and millions in duck stamp funds to keep these bottomlands from becoming as extinct as the woodpecker was thought to be.
Dennis hazards a guess that perhaps as many as 20 pairs occupy the bottomland hardwoods from Cache River south to (and probably including) the White River National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses almost 90 miles (145 km) of the White River in Arkansas down to the Mississippi River.
The Columbia Bottomlands provides the only expanse of forest adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico in Texas.
In most cases, this was manifest as deposition of fine particulates (most likely silt and clay fractions), but in bottomlands located downslope from severely-impacted uplands significant deposits of coarse particulates (primarily sand) were observed.
In the late nineteenth century, the Tallahatchie bottomlands formed an "eastern gateway to the still almost virgin wilderness of swamp and jungle which stretched westward from the hills to the towns and plantations along the Mississippi" (Reivers 738) and created the physical setting for "The Bear" and many other wilderness stories by Faulkner.
People talk about the Everglades; there ought to be the same image of these bottomlands in the national conscience.