botulinus

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Related to botulinum: Clostridium botulinum, Botulinum toxin type a, Botulinum antitoxin

botulinus

[′bäch·ə′lī·nəs]
(microbiology)
A bacterium that causes botulism.
References in periodicals archive ?
botulinum that can occasionally produce botulinum neurotoxin (HPA, 2013).
Contraindications Dysport is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to any botulinum toxin preparation or to any of the components; or in the presence of infection at the proposed injection site(s).
KS) to establish a joint venture Medybloom to develop and promote Type A Botulinum Toxin ("Botulinum Toxin") business in China.
To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is imperative to comprehend the mechanisms by which these spores germinate.
Kane and Sattler present a practical workbook and detailed overview of all aspects of aesthetic botulinum toxin therapy, using drawings, photographs, and on-line film clips to illustrate the procedures described in the text.
While very little is known about the interaction between blood vessels and nerves in the skin, dermatologists are optimistic that the new research exploring how botulinum toxin type A can influence this interaction could lead to a new therapy for chronic inflammatory skin conditions.
Thirteen years later, they received the FDA's approval to market the use of botulinum toxin (type A) as a treatment which--in people aged 18 to 65 years--would temporarily improve the appearance of moderate to severe frown lines between the eyebrows (glabellar lines).
There are other Botulinum Toxin Type A products available, including; Azzalure and Dysport, made by Galderma, and Bocouture and Xeomin from Merz.
Botulinum toxin acts presynaptically at cholinergic nerve terminals by preventing acetylcholine exocytosis and release and causes muscle paresis which can last for two to three months (1,2).
Serum, stool, gastric aspirate, and enema samples were assayed for botulinum toxin by using the mouse bioassay (16).
The data on Botulinum toxin A (BTX A) are much more encouraging.