boulder


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Boulder,

city (1990 pop. 83,312), seat of Boulder co., N central Colo.; inc. 1871. A Rocky Mountain resort and a suburb of Denver, it is the seat of the Univ. of Colorado (1876). Industries include aerospace and biological research; the manufacture of machinery, electric, electronic, and computer equipment, and medical supplies; and software development. Boulder is home to the National Center for Atmospheric Research and other government and private research operations and is known as a mountain sports and "New Age" mecca.

boulder,

large rock fragment formed by detachment from its parent consolidated rock by weathering and erosion. In engineering and geology, especially in the United States, the term is applied to loose rocks having specific sizes according to various systems of classification, i.e. the Wentworth scale (for C. K. Wentworth, American geologist), where a boulder has one linear dimension of at least 10.1 in. (25.4 cm). Boulders transported by glacial ice are usually referred to as glacial erratics; glacial boulder fields, or felsenmeer, containing large blocks of angular rock broken from intense frost action are evidence that the region has experienced glacial action in the past. See driftdrift,
deposit of mixed clay, gravel, sand, and boulders transported and laid down by glaciers. Stratified, or glaciofluvial, drift is carried by waters flowing from the melting ice of a glacier.
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; morainemoraine
, a formation composed of unsorted and unbedded rock and soil debris called till, which was deposited by a glacier. The till that falls on the sides of a valley glacier from the bounding cliffs makes up lateral moraines, running parallel to the valley sides.
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boulder

[′bōl·dər]
(geology)
A worn rock with a diameter exceeding 256 millimeters. Also spelled bowlder.

boulder

A naturally rounded rock fragment larger than 10 in. (25 cm) in diameter; used for crude walls and foundations, generally in mortar.

boulder

1. a smooth rounded mass of rock that has a diameter greater than 25cm and that has been shaped by erosion and transported by ice or water from its original position
2. Geology a rock fragment with a diameter greater than 256 mm and thus bigger than a cobble
References in classic literature ?
Swift as I was I was none too soon, for the green warrior had been overtaken ere he had made half the distance to the forest, and now he stood with his back to a boulder, while the herd, temporarily balked, hissed and screeched about him.
Enormous granite boulders blocked the way on every hand; deep rifts in the ice threatened to engulf us at the least misstep; and from the north a slight breeze wafted to our nostrils an unspeakable stench that almost choked us.
From behind my boulder I threw up the heavy express rifle--a mighty engine of destruction that might bring down a cave bear or a mammoth at a single shot--and let drive at the Sagoth's broad, hairy breast.
With the coming of night he set forth, and Werper, who had scaled the cliffs alone behind the ape-man's party, and hidden through the day among the rough boulders of the mountain top, slunk stealthily after him.
Gilbert sat down beside her on the boulder and held out his Mayflowers.
The man who followed slipped on a smooth boulder, nearly fell, but recovered himself with a violent effort, at the same time uttering a sharp exclamation of pain.
Dorothy stopped at once and sat down upon a broad boulder, for she was all out of breath.
She gave me the hatchet and told me to take a hack at the boulder, which I did, again and again, for yellow spots sprang up from under every blow.
The girl of the golden hair and sea-blue eyes was sitting on a boulder of the headland, half-hidden by a jutting rock.
Lyell, that the large quadrupeds lived subsequently to that period, when boulders were brought into latitudes at which icebergs now never arrive: from conclusive but indirect reasons we may feel sure, that in the southern hemisphere the Macrauchenia, also, lived long subsequently to the ice-transporting boulder-period.
There was a sound of crashing through underbrush, the ringing of steel-shod hoofs on stone, and an occasional and mossy descent of a dislodged boulder that bounded from the hill and fetched up with a final splash in the torrent that rushed over a wild chaos of rocks beneath him.
Here he cast about for a comfortable seat, lighted on a big boulder under a birch by the trackside, sate down upon it with a very long, serious upper lip, and the sun now shining in upon us between two peaks, put his pocket-handkerchief over his cocked hat to shelter him.