bouleuterion


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bouleuterion

1. In ancient Greece, a place of assembly, esp. for a public body.
2. In modern Greece, a chamber for the sitting of a legislative body or the building in which such a chamber is situated.
References in periodicals archive ?
12 has been generously suggested to me by Christopher Jones, building upon the recent breakthrough by Christina Kokkinia, (15) who, recognising that such a rebuke would be inappropriate in a document publicly posted in the Ephesians' own city (on the proscenium of the bouleuterion, no less), realised that, instead of a contrast, an endorsement is required; she suggested either prostiqhsin th pol[ei: all um]ei~ ou[n] apodecesqe auton, i.
After she worked one campaign on the Upper Agora North and Bouleuterion sites, she has since 1998 been supervising the excavations of the late antique urban mansion in the eastern domestic area of Sagalassos.
The existence of the Agora in Dedros cannot be discerned until the beginning of the 7th century BC, and the first public building is the bouleuterion of the Olympian sanctuary, dated around 600 BC (Strom 1984: 357).
It features the temples of Zeus, Hera, the Stadium, the Bouleuterion where athletes were sworn in, the Prytaneion (site of the eternal flame) the Treasuries, the Gymnasium and the Leonidaion (a guesthouse dating from 330 BC).
There are remnants of a gymnasion, a Roman bath and a bouleuterion.
Teachers of ancient history through the medium of English will be interested in Neville Morley's chapter on how translators have tried to deal with Greek terms for which there are no precise modern equivalents, words such as agora, bouleuterion, banausoi, dikaiosyne, dokimasia and so on.