bound water


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bound water

[¦bau̇nd ′wȯd·ər]
(chemistry)
Water that is a portion of a system such as tissues or soil and does not form ice crystals until the material's temperature is lowered to about -20°C.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the formation of bound water molecules is slightly hindered at the higher nanoclay content of 3 wt%.
Based on this Portland cement hydration model, Wang [12] evaluates chemically bound water, adiabatic temperature rising, and mechanical properties of high strength concrete incorporating Portland cement with different mineral compositions and different Blaine surfaces.
In order to examine our coating with regard to bound water, DSC measurements of swollen PVP were performed.
This increments in water fraction as response to compost treatments may be due to the improvement in nutrients content which led to more bound water to maintain their structural integrity and cell wall properties as compared with low-nutrient plants.
In theory, any material with sufficient amounts of silicon and aluminum oxides can be used as a raw material, and can potentially produce geopolymer concrete, with quality level dependent upon on parameters such as particle distribution, amount of bound water and impurities, among others.
A calciner is defined as equipment that removes chemically bound water or gases from minerals through direct or indirect heating; a dryer removes free water from minerals through direct or indirect heating.
We model the presence of bound water as in [36] by considering a certain volume fraction of water to have a principal relaxation time [[tau].
Soil moisture has biphasic dielectric properties, and water in the formation is divided into two parts: bound water and free water.
The results indicated that with the decrease in temperature electrolyte leakage (EL) and thiobarbituric acid -reactive substances (TBARS) content increased markedly and reached two peaks in September and February, ratio of free water content (FWC) to bound water content (BWC) decreased and the lowest value was found in the winter (during November to January).
Secondary drying (desorption) completes the process and "drives the ionically bound water from the material," explains Reihbandt.
The bound water loss was found to be much less than for the unbound type, and for that latter reason loss of water during the desorption process was the highest for Ketac-Molar when compared to the other five tested materials.