boundary

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boundary

Cricket
a. the marked limit of the playing area
b. a stroke that hits the ball beyond this limit
c. the four runs scored with such a stroke, or the six runs if the ball crosses the boundary without touching the ground

Boundary

The outer limits of an area, such as a piece of property; which may be defined by a series of markers, fence, stone wall, or other natural feature.

Boundary

 

(Russian, mezha), a narrow strip of uncultivated land, usually overgrown with weeds (mezhnik), that served as the zone between two pieces of landed property.

Boundaries were established by land surveys; sometimes they were indicated by boundary marks. They came into existence when the individual peasants or peasant families began to hold land and when the primitive clan commune developed into a communal organization of neighbors. As part of a system in which private property in land existed, boundaries served to separate the lands of one holder from those of another (separating peasant landed possessions from each other and from those of the pomeshchiki [landlords], state, and crown), as well as to demarcate peasant plots within the lands of the commune. Boundaries were altered when lands were purchased, sold, or, in the case of communes, repartitioned. Special legislation existed to deal with boundaries. During the class struggle of peasants against pomeshchiki, there were instances of the former seizing the lands of the latter; the seizures were usually accompanied by the ploughing up and destruction of the boundaries. Often there were arguments and sharp clashes among the village population over the accuracy of the boundaries and over their preservation.

In the USSR, where the system of socialist land tenure exists, the imperfect system of boundaries has been replaced by a more accurate system of land boundaries determined on the basis of modern land allocation.

boundary

[′bau̇n·drē]
(electronics)
An interface between p- and n-type semiconductor materials, at which donor and acceptor concentrations are equal.
(geology)
A line between areas occupied by rocks or formations of different type and age.
(mathematics)
(science and technology)
A line or area which determines inclusion in a system.

land boundary

A line of demarcation between adjoining parcels of land. The parcels of land may be of the same or different ownership, but were distinguished at one time in the history of their descent by separate legal descriptions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, attendance boundaries present a variety of unexpected and difficult challenges, given the counterintuitive relationships between schools and the attendance boundaries they serve.
CALIFORNIA CITY - California City officials are revising the community's planned annexation to better shape boundaries for future growth.
Establishing boundaries is important because the boundary of a property determines what land the property owner or occupier has rights and liabilities over.
The main objective is to show how the usage of the markers changed over the centuries, and how linear boundaries became more significant and precise due to technical improvements in land surveys.
As we discuss boundaries, bear in mind the following considerations:
Curiously, instances of excessively thick boundaries don't tend to get recognized as having an ethical dimension in the way that inappropriately permeable boundaries do.
Indeed, some students of urban affairs believe that a key to improved delivery of local public services rests in much greater flexibility among municipal boundaries.
The majority of Joe Walker students advance to Quartz Hill High School, but the White Fence Farms area is within the boundaries of Highland High School.
health care providers and organizations jointly share the responsibility with the government for the effective delivery of health Care that goes beyond boundaries and mandates.
Like Marshall, Channing was not only reinterpreting a sacred text but redefining intellectual boundaries and arguing for a flexible view of necessary and proper means.
Nevertheless, the case of Dolly illustrates the visceral reaction--sometimes called the Yuk-factor--that arises when "natural" boundaries are violated.
Breaking Boundaries, on the other hand, is a monograph, in which Smith, drawing primarily upon the theories of Bakhtin, Stephen Greenblatt, Michel de Certeau, and Gregory Bateson (2), argues that English theater after 1585 features a growing interest in breaking social and theatrical boundaries, culminating in "the complete dissolution of boundaries between theater, punitive practice and carnival play in the 'social drama' of 1649" (137).