boundary

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boundary

Cricket
a. the marked limit of the playing area
b. a stroke that hits the ball beyond this limit
c. the four runs scored with such a stroke, or the six runs if the ball crosses the boundary without touching the ground

Boundary

The outer limits of an area, such as a piece of property; which may be defined by a series of markers, fence, stone wall, or other natural feature.

Boundary

 

(Russian, mezha), a narrow strip of uncultivated land, usually overgrown with weeds (mezhnik), that served as the zone between two pieces of landed property.

Boundaries were established by land surveys; sometimes they were indicated by boundary marks. They came into existence when the individual peasants or peasant families began to hold land and when the primitive clan commune developed into a communal organization of neighbors. As part of a system in which private property in land existed, boundaries served to separate the lands of one holder from those of another (separating peasant landed possessions from each other and from those of the pomeshchiki [landlords], state, and crown), as well as to demarcate peasant plots within the lands of the commune. Boundaries were altered when lands were purchased, sold, or, in the case of communes, repartitioned. Special legislation existed to deal with boundaries. During the class struggle of peasants against pomeshchiki, there were instances of the former seizing the lands of the latter; the seizures were usually accompanied by the ploughing up and destruction of the boundaries. Often there were arguments and sharp clashes among the village population over the accuracy of the boundaries and over their preservation.

In the USSR, where the system of socialist land tenure exists, the imperfect system of boundaries has been replaced by a more accurate system of land boundaries determined on the basis of modern land allocation.

boundary

[′bau̇n·drē]
(electronics)
An interface between p- and n-type semiconductor materials, at which donor and acceptor concentrations are equal.
(geology)
A line between areas occupied by rocks or formations of different type and age.
(mathematics)
(science and technology)
A line or area which determines inclusion in a system.

land boundary

A line of demarcation between adjoining parcels of land. The parcels of land may be of the same or different ownership, but were distinguished at one time in the history of their descent by separate legal descriptions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Chebukati did not comment on Nasa's reservation on its handling of boundaries review.
These districts are de facto attendance boundaries since the Census Bureau distributes a national file of school district boundaries in GIS format.
Because literacy was not widespread at the time, the fixing of boundaries was a public ritual that included riding or walking along the length of the boundary.
In working with clients, I occasionally try to help them become more aware of their personal boundaries using a "proximity exercise.
It might be possible, however, to realize a very rough approximation, if there were a much wider flexibility in local governmental forms and boundaries than exists at present.
Some respondents in the North asked whether current patient referral practices (many are sent out of province for treatment) were being taken into account when determining LHINS boundaries.
10) In other words, how do we discern which boundaries arise from prejudice and need to be overcome, and which circumscribe areas that ought not to be violated?
Other types of boundaries may be harder to recognize.
The theory behind increasingly popular experiments with confined electrons--held in quantum dots or wells, for instance--assumes perfectly smooth, orderly boundaries, but the real world is not so ideal, he says.
Gieryn's (1983), initial conception of boundary work emphasized the boundaries that separate science from everything else.
The concentrations are, in general, discontinuous across ply layer boundaries due to differences in solubilities.