boundary


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Related to boundary: boundary layer

boundary

Cricket
a. the marked limit of the playing area
b. a stroke that hits the ball beyond this limit
c. the four runs scored with such a stroke, or the six runs if the ball crosses the boundary without touching the ground

Boundary

The outer limits of an area, such as a piece of property; which may be defined by a series of markers, fence, stone wall, or other natural feature.

Boundary

 

(Russian, mezha), a narrow strip of uncultivated land, usually overgrown with weeds (mezhnik), that served as the zone between two pieces of landed property.

Boundaries were established by land surveys; sometimes they were indicated by boundary marks. They came into existence when the individual peasants or peasant families began to hold land and when the primitive clan commune developed into a communal organization of neighbors. As part of a system in which private property in land existed, boundaries served to separate the lands of one holder from those of another (separating peasant landed possessions from each other and from those of the pomeshchiki [landlords], state, and crown), as well as to demarcate peasant plots within the lands of the commune. Boundaries were altered when lands were purchased, sold, or, in the case of communes, repartitioned. Special legislation existed to deal with boundaries. During the class struggle of peasants against pomeshchiki, there were instances of the former seizing the lands of the latter; the seizures were usually accompanied by the ploughing up and destruction of the boundaries. Often there were arguments and sharp clashes among the village population over the accuracy of the boundaries and over their preservation.

In the USSR, where the system of socialist land tenure exists, the imperfect system of boundaries has been replaced by a more accurate system of land boundaries determined on the basis of modern land allocation.

boundary

[′bau̇n·drē]
(electronics)
An interface between p- and n-type semiconductor materials, at which donor and acceptor concentrations are equal.
(geology)
A line between areas occupied by rocks or formations of different type and age.
(mathematics)
(science and technology)
A line or area which determines inclusion in a system.

land boundary

A line of demarcation between adjoining parcels of land. The parcels of land may be of the same or different ownership, but were distinguished at one time in the history of their descent by separate legal descriptions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Various causes may result in the boundary scan implementation at the IC level running into roadblocks.
The stages involved in a boundary dispute are: | Establishing the boundary from |the title deeds and any essential evidence Consider if the boundary has been |amended by any informal agreement, the parties' conduct or adverse possession.
Each position in the DR and IR columns represents a state of the TAP controller of the 16-state machine that controls each boundary scan device.
In these districts, every attendance boundary coincides with the entire school district boundary.
Boundary development from broad intermediary zones to linear boundaries from the conquest to the 17th century depended on a number of factors: demographic growth, expansion of land use, scarcity of free lands, needs of land consolidation, desire to improve area management, reinforcement of rights to land ownership (Selart, 1998).
We may operate with some rules of thumb about boundaries, but most boundary judgments are contextual.
What is most helpful, scattered throughout the text, are "profiles" of individuals whom Gunderson considers to be boundary leaders.
As Richard Briffault of Columbia Law School has written, in many cases municipalities "actually lack the authority to provide extra local services and require a special legislative grant of power before they are permitted to project their services across the local boundary line.
The second reality is that boundary crossing, in and of itself, does not provide a very reliable moral yardstick.
To avoid these difficulties, or at least replace them with more tractable ones, self-similarity was used in the analysis of an intermediate fixed boundary in place of the changing boundary.
Now, researchers say they've found a high concentration of fullerenes--soccerball-shape molecules of carbon also known as buckyballs--in sediments laid down at the so-called P-T boundary, the point in time between the Permian and Triassic periods.