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bounded

(theory)
In domain theory, a subset S of a cpo X is bounded if there exists x in X such that for all s in S, s <= x. In other words, there is some element above all of S. If every bounded subset of X has a least upper bound then X is boundedly complete.

("<=" is written in LaTeX as \subseteq).
References in periodicals archive ?
212) On an issue like the debate over the appropriate policy response to boundedly rational consumer decisionmaking, for example, this may be the only sensible way to resolve the irreconcilable differences evoked by the debate over paternalism.
tA] onto the eigenspaces associated with a bounded subset of [sigma](A) becomes boundedly invertible.
Garrett (1992), |Learning about Mmnetary union: an analysis of boundedly rational learning in European labour markets', National Institute Discussion Paper No.
This can, in turn, increase the transaction costs from boundedly rational behavior.
Other terms in the literature also need further clarification, including the terms boundedly rational, ecologically rational, and socially rational (Chase, Hertwig, and Gigerenzer 1998).
The intuition behind this assumption is that even if boundedly rational people may not want to exclude the possibility that an event occurs, they may still be unable to specify how likely the event is.
The article by Michael Cwikel is devoted to a more than 40 years open problem of whether an operator mapping one Banach couple boundedly into another and acting compactly on one (or even both) of the 'endpoint' spaces also acts compactly between the complex interpolation spaces generated by these couples.
In addition, as with standard form contracts, settlors are boundedly rational and underestimate the odds that fine-print trust clauses will substantially affect beneficiaries' rights.
1203, 1243 (2003) ("Because of cognitive limitations, as well as external constraints on time and effort, all plausible decisionmaking approaches are necessarily boundedly rational.
In a recent issue of this journal, an interesting paper by West and Linster (2003) used fuzzy rules to show that Nash equilibrium behavior can be achieved by boundedly rational agents in two-player games with infinite strategy spaces.
Signals or cues, so long as they are accessible and relevant to the decision maker, are useful sources of information for boundedly rational individuals who rely on mental short cuts to make consistent decisions on complex issues without having complete information (Mondak 1993, 189; Spence 1974; Zaller 1992).