bouton


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bouton

[bü′tōn]
(neuroscience)
A club-shaped enlargement at the end of a nerve fiber. Also known as end bulb.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bouton, along with the other man, allegedly stole multiple items from the home and reportedly purchased about $1,000 worth of merchandise on the stolen credit cards.
Microtubules (red) and actin filaments (purple) help give the synaptic bouton structure and move cargo around inside the neuron.
Bouton refused to recant and the ensuing publicity made Ball Four a bestseller.
I am completely determined to continue with our strategy because, even taking into account our very bad year in 2007 due to the financial crisis and this fraud, it's this strategy which creates and will create the most value for shareholders," Mr Bouton said.
Several hundred bank employees poured out of its Paris headquarters to defend Mr Bouton in an impromptu demonstration during the board meeting, saying his departure would only make things worse.
To his credit, however, Bouton includes summaries at the end of each chapter and clever "What does it all mean?
According to Bouton (1993), and assuming that instructions may work as contextual stimuli in this situation, we expected that the change in the context between reversal training and testing would lead to renewal of Phase 1 performance, that is, participants in this group would show behavior according to the form criterion during the test.
JIM BOUTON, former Yankees pitcher and author of Ball Four: "Baseball players are smarter than football players.
The first was sports icon Jim Bouton, the former New York Yankee pitcher and author of "Ball Four," a 1970 expose of baseball's raucous underbelly.
The flower girls were Emily Alizabeth Duprey and Blake Madison Bouton.
The stakes were high long before they had nuclear weapons," says Marshall Bouton, a South Asia expert and president of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations.
There are many efficient models of capitalism other than the American model," huffed Societe Generale CEO Daniel Bouton, who nonetheless allowed that the EU should change the decision-making process to allow harmonized product standards and regulations.