box elder

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box elder:

see maplemaple,
common name for the genus Acer of the Aceraceae, a family of deciduous trees and shrubs of the Northern Hemisphere, found mainly in temperate regions and on tropical mountain slopes. Acer, the principal genus, includes the many maples and the box elder.
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box elder

box elder

30-60 ft (10-20m) tree with smooth green twigs and leaves that resemble poison ivy, but leaves are opposite each other, not alternating. Has maple-tree-type winged seed keys but thinner and longer than maple. Keys can be eaten. Sap boiled down for sugar. Very popular source of sugar. The inner bark can be eaten raw, boiled, roasted or dried and pounded into a powder with fiber sifted out. Tea made from inner bark can induce vomiting. Young leaves are edible and somewhat sweet, but have little nutrition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our experimental results confirmed our observational results; cottonwoods growing in association with box elder are more likely to be colonized by fall canker-worm and suffer greater defoliation than cottonwoods growing in other associations (Fig.
001), also dropped significantly with increased distance from box elder, showing that associational susceptibility is a function of distance from box elder ([L.
Observationally, cankerworm egg densities were 26 times greater on box elder than cottonwood (U = 8, n = 39, P [less than] 0.
Fourth instar larvae ate three times more box elder than cottonwood (Z = -3.
In contrast to the high mortality exhibited by first instar larvae on cottonwood, fourth instar larvae that were switched from box elder to cottonwood did not exhibit increased mortality over larvae that remained on box elder.
The contrast between cottonwoods under box elder and cottonwoods under cottonwood is particularly important.
Fall cankerworm larvae do not shift from box elder to cottonwood as a result of changes in larval host preferences.
Cottonwood defoliation averaged 30-50% for individuals growing in close proximity to box elder, and some suffered 100% defoliation.
First, fall cankerworm is a generalist herbivore with respect to box elder and cottonwood.