box office

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box office

A room or booth with one or more windows facing a theater lobby or public area; used for sale of tickets.
References in periodicals archive ?
With multiplatinum albums, billion-dollar box-office receipts, and production credits on several blockbusters, Smith is a triple threat in Hollywood.
Sony Pictures Entertainment, which is distributing the ``Bond'' film, is bullish on its box-office chances, despite Pierce Brosnan being replaced as Agent 007 by Daniel Craig.
Globally, Clint Eastwood, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Sylvester Stallone became the biggest box-office draws.
Deeds,'' ``Big Daddy'' and ``Anger Management,'' which all grossed $120 million or more domestically, than his occasional box-office misfires, including ``Spanglish,'' ``Little Nicky'' and ``Punch Drunk Love.
The box-office figures are expressed in millions in parenthesis.
box-office mark in only nine days matching a TWDC company record for a live-action film.
2 percent from the same time a year ago, and weekend box-office receipts have been up for four consecutive weeks.
By press time, the film had raked in over $7 million, making it the all-time domestic box-office champ in Canadian film history.
With The Patron Edge Online, we will be able to reduce the burden on box-office staff and capture vital information about our patrons that will help us further personalize our services.
The change at the top comes as Universal is coming off a year in which it enjoyed a surprise smash with the comedy "The 40 Year Old Virgin" but also suffered a major disappointment with its summer release "Cinderella Man," which failed to bring the award recognition or box-office numbers that had been expected and its Academy Award Best Picture nominee "Munich" grossed just $47 million domestically.
The dive further into this box-office phenomenon will begin in September when Paramount and Fox launch their "TITANIC" Special Edition DVD website: titanicmovie.
Audiences needed more motivation to get them out of the house and into the movie theater than ever before,'' notes Paul Dergarabedian, president of the box-office tracking firm Exhibitor Relations.