bracket


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brackets

Brackets ( [ ] ), sometimes known as square brackets, are similar to parentheses in that they are used to contain information that does not impact the overall grammatical structure of the sentence. However, rather than indicating information that is supplemental or incidental, brackets are usually used within quoted speech to indicate that a writer has added material to the quotation to provide clarifying or explanatory information.
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bracket

1. Architect a support projecting from the side of a wall or other structure
2. a general name for parenthesis, square bracket and brace (sense 6)
3. the distance between two preliminary shots of artillery fire in range-finding
4. a skating figure consisting of two arcs meeting at a point, tracing the shape ⋎

Bracket

A projection from a vertical surface providing structural or visual support under cornices, balconies, windows, or any other overhanging member.

Bracket

 

an artillery firing term indicating firing short or over with respect to the target. When a shell falls (explodes) in front of the target (short), it is called a minus; when it goes beyond the target (over), it is called a plus. Firing with the purpose of destroying the target should not commence before a bracket is determined. For this reason, adjustment is made to determine the assured minimum bracket (two pluses and two minuses).


Bracket

 

(1) One of a pair of punctuation marks consisting of two vertical strokes, either round, as with parentheses (), rectangular, as with square brackets [], or irregular in shape, as with braces {}. Brackets are used to isolate words, parts of sentences, or whole sentences that contain information and explanatory matter supplementary to the main part of a text. In Russian, diagonals / / are often used for this purpose, especially in typescript. One use of brackets is seen in the following: “Scholars of Middle Asia (Abu Nasr al-Farabi [tenth century] and Ibn Sina [Avicenna, tenth and 11th centuries]) made a great contribution to the development of music.” In linguistics, square brackets are used to indicate the phonetic transcription of a sound, and diagonals are used to indicate phonemes. In Russian, diagonals and angle brackets are used to designate ellipses in a shortened text.

(2) In mathematics, the marks (),[], and {} are used to indicate the order in which mathematical operations are performed.

bracket

[′brak·ət]
(building construction)
A vertical board to support the tread of a stair.
(civil engineering)
A projecting support.
(ordnance)
The distance between two strikes or series of strikes, one of which is over the target and the other short of it, or one of which is to the right and the other to the left of the target.
A group of shots (or bombs) which fall both over and short of the target.

bracket

bracket, 1
1. Any overhanging member projecting from a wall or other body to support a weight (such as a cornice) acting outside the wall.
2. A knee brace which connects a post or batter brace to an overhead strut.
3. A projecting electrical wall fitting.
4. A short board attached to the carrying member on the underside of a stair supporting the tread.
5. A decorative detail attached to the spring of a stair under the overhanging edge of the treads. Also see eaves bracket, stair bracket, step bracket, wall bracket.

bracket

(character)
(Or square bracket) A left bracket or right bracket.

Often used loosely for parentheses, square brackets, braces, angle brackets, or any other kind of unequal paired delimiters.

bracket

In programming, brackets (the [ and ] characters) are used to enclose numbers and subscripts. For example, in the C statement int menustart [4] = {2,9,15,22}; the [4] indicates the number of elements in the array, and the contents are enclosed in curly braces. In the C expression, if (ABCbuff [501] == '\x1'), the [501] indicates the 501st byte of the ABC buffer (starting with 0). See also bracketing.
References in classic literature ?
A gas bracket hung from the middle of the ceiling over a dark, shabby writing-desk covered with a litter of yellowish dusty documents.
36} The lines which I have enclosed in brackets are evidently an afterthought--added probably by the writer herself--for they evince the same instinctively greater interest in anything that may concern a woman, which is so noticeable throughout the poem.
81} This line is enclosed in brackets in the received text, and is omitted (with note) by Messrs.
91} I suppose the lines I have enclosed in brackets to have been added by the author when she enlarged her original scheme by the addition of books i.
Protests," "Uproar," and "General appeal to the Chairman" were three of the first brackets which caught my eye.
Archer mounted the stairs, turned up the light, and put a match to the brackets on each side of the library mantelpiece.
At intervals, apparently at each street intersection, an oil flare sputtered dimly from brackets set in the walls a trifle higher than a man's head.
Ida was in her boudoir, a tiny little tapestried room, as neat and dainty as herself, with low walls hung with Imari plaques and with pretty little Swiss brackets bearing blue Kaga ware, or the pure white Coalport china.
Upon the mantels, and on many shelves and brackets and tables, were clustered ornaments of every description, seemingly made out of all sorts of metals, glass, china, stones and marbles.
And he pointed to the further end of the chateau, where a ladder stood resting against the stone brackets supporting the terrace, under the window which I had found open.
But, the little shop is so excessively dark, is stuck so full of black shelves and brackets and nooks and corners, that he sees Mr Venus's cup and saucer only because it is close under the candle, and does not see from what mysterious recess Mr Venus produces another for himself until it is under his nose.
In all sorts of recesses, and on all kinds of brackets, stood massive old silver candlesticks with four branches each.