branch

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Related to branches: Branches of government

branch

1. a secondary woody stem arising from the trunk or bough of a tree or the main stem of a shrub
2. a subdivision of the stem or root of any other plant
3. US any small stream
4. Maths a section of a curve separated from the rest of the curve by discontinuities or special points
5. Computing a departure from the normal sequence of programmed instructions into a separate program area
6. Physics an alternative route in an atomic or nuclear decay series

Branch

 

an extension of a river. A branch is produced by sedimentation in the form of an alluvial islet or island or by breaks in meanders. A myriad of branches is especially characteristic of deltas. Less frequently, branches are produced when a current must bypass nonerodible rock projecting from the river bottom. Depending on changes in a stream’s regime, the current shapes alternating branches. A branch may become the principal stream when the original stream gradually shallows and turns into a secondary branch.

Local Russian names for branches include volozhka (Volga), poloi (Severnaia Dvina), rechishche (Dnieper), starodon’e (Don), and girlo (Danube). Secondary branches are called channels.


Branch

 

an organization that is a part of another organization, enterprise, or institution and that has the status of a juridical person. The branch performs some of the parent organization’s functions, frequently in a place other than the organization’s headquarters. In Soviet law, branches are established according to procedures specified in the legislation of the USSR and Union republics. In civil operations, a branch acts on behalf of the legal person that formed it; the authority to do so comes from a power of attorney given to the director of the branch (art. 31 of the Civil Code of the RSFSR). The status of a representative of a legal person differs from that of a branch in that the former always operates in a place other than the headquarters of the organization and performs some auxiliary, rather than primary, function or activity.

branch

[branch]
(botany)
A shoot or secondary stem on the trunk or a limb of a tree.
(computer science)
Any one of a number of instruction sequences in a program to which computer control is passed, depending upon the status of one or more variables.
(electricity)
A portion of a network consisting of one or more two-terminal elements in series. Also known as arm.
(engineering)
In a piping system, a pipe that originates in or discharges into another pipe. Also known as branch line.
(hydrology)
A small stream that merges into another, generally bigger, stream.
(mathematics)
A complex function which is analytic in some domain and which takes on one of the values of a multiple-valued function in that domain.
A section of a curve that is separated from other sections of the curve by discontinuities, singular points, or other special points such as maxima and minima.
(nuclear physics)
A product resulting from one mode of decay of a radioactive nuclide that has two or more modes of decay.
(organic chemistry)
(science and technology)
An area of study representing an independent offshoot of a related basic discipline.

branch

In plumbing, a pipe which originates in or discharges into a main, submain, riser, or stack.

branch

(mathematics)
An edge in a tree.

branch

(programming)
A jump.

branch

(1) In a low-level programming language, a statement that directs the computer to go to some other part of the program. In assembly languages, "branch" or "jump" instructions provide this capability. In high-level languages, a "goto" statement, as well as several other programming constructs, provide the equivalent of the branch. For example, "IF A EQUALS B GOTO MATCH_ROUTINE." See branch prediction and do loop.

(2) A connection between two blocks in a flowchart or two nodes in a network.
References in classic literature ?
He stepped over to the nearest tree--an old, old one with gray lichen all over its bark, but upholding a curtain of tangled sprays and branches.
That impenetrable forest, with its innumerable trunks and branches, threw him into a terrible state of consternation.
When the two listened to him he was shouting at the top of his voice, "And so I shall have a tribe of my own, and lead them through the branches all day long.
The members of the judiciary department, again, are appointable by the executive department, and removable by the same authority on the address of the two legislative branches.
She could pass through the branches of the great trees now with all the agility and stealth of The Killer himself.
The Parsee lit a fire in the bungalow with a few dry branches, and the warmth was very grateful, provisions purchased at Kholby sufficed for supper, and the travellers ate ravenously.
Thus individual branches of knowledge are not relative.
It was a beautiful sunset, and a sight of the glowing rays, mantling the tree-tops and rustling branches, gladdened every heart.
The branches on which I was suspended over the yawning chasm swang to and fro in the air, and I expected them every moment to snap in twain.
These mountains give rise, not merely to the Wind or Bighorn River, but to several branches of the Yellowstone and the Missouri on the east, and of the Columbia and Colorado on the west; thus dividing the sources of these mighty streams.
Many of the trees under which we passed had their branches bowed down with fruit, some of which were of familiar sorts, while other varieties were new.
The Scarecrow, who was in the lead, finally discovered a big tree with such wide-spreading branches that there was room for the party to pass underneath.

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