branchial arch


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Related to branchial arch: branchial arch derivatives

branchial arch

[′braŋ·kē·əl ′ärch]
(vertebrate zoology)
One of the series of paired arches on the sides of the pharynx which support the gills in fishes and amphibians.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distinguished from all other congeners by the combination of the following features: anterior portion of trunk slightly wider than deep, jaws short, snout blunt, tip of anal fin rounded in male, caudal fin elliptical to acuminate in male, pelvic-fin tip reaching the anterior portion of the anal-fin base in male, dorsal-fin origin posterior to anal-fin base, dorsal-fin rays 5-7, anal-fin rays 9-11, frontal squamation S-patterned, contact organs absent, frontal scales arranged circularly, canal preopercular short and opened, longitudinal series of scales 29-32, gill rakers of first branchial arch 1 + 7, oblique rows of red dots on flank in male, transverse black bar through the chin, and no black spot on dorsal portion of caudal-fin.
Our case illustrates the known developmental migration of second branchial arch anomalies while demonstrating an unusual finding of a complete branchial fistula presenting as an intraoral tonsillar cyst.
2,3,6) Branchial anomalies are typically located, depending on the involved branchial arch, but clinicians must be aware of these locations.
Fourth branchial arch anomaly and pyriform sinus fistula as a rare cause of recurrent retropharyngeal abscess and thyroiditis in an adult.
In view of the boy's age and the location of the cyst, we made a provisional diagnosis of a branchial arch remnant, most likely from the second arch.
1) They are derived from different embryologic cell anlages: the epibranchial placode of the second branchial arch and the neural crest of the facial primordium, respectively.
A fistulous tract occurs when the branchial arch does not completely fuse with the epicardial ridge, resulting in an internal breakdown.
The ICA normally develops from the third branchial arch.
To date, no correlation has been observed between the genetic background and embryologic branchial arch malformations.