branch

(redirected from branchlets)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

branch

1. a secondary woody stem arising from the trunk or bough of a tree or the main stem of a shrub
2. a subdivision of the stem or root of any other plant
3. US any small stream
4. Maths a section of a curve separated from the rest of the curve by discontinuities or special points
5. Computing a departure from the normal sequence of programmed instructions into a separate program area
6. Physics an alternative route in an atomic or nuclear decay series

Branch

 

an extension of a river. A branch is produced by sedimentation in the form of an alluvial islet or island or by breaks in meanders. A myriad of branches is especially characteristic of deltas. Less frequently, branches are produced when a current must bypass nonerodible rock projecting from the river bottom. Depending on changes in a stream’s regime, the current shapes alternating branches. A branch may become the principal stream when the original stream gradually shallows and turns into a secondary branch.

Local Russian names for branches include volozhka (Volga), poloi (Severnaia Dvina), rechishche (Dnieper), starodon’e (Don), and girlo (Danube). Secondary branches are called channels.


Branch

 

an organization that is a part of another organization, enterprise, or institution and that has the status of a juridical person. The branch performs some of the parent organization’s functions, frequently in a place other than the organization’s headquarters. In Soviet law, branches are established according to procedures specified in the legislation of the USSR and Union republics. In civil operations, a branch acts on behalf of the legal person that formed it; the authority to do so comes from a power of attorney given to the director of the branch (art. 31 of the Civil Code of the RSFSR). The status of a representative of a legal person differs from that of a branch in that the former always operates in a place other than the headquarters of the organization and performs some auxiliary, rather than primary, function or activity.

branch

[branch]
(botany)
A shoot or secondary stem on the trunk or a limb of a tree.
(computer science)
Any one of a number of instruction sequences in a program to which computer control is passed, depending upon the status of one or more variables.
(electricity)
A portion of a network consisting of one or more two-terminal elements in series. Also known as arm.
(engineering)
In a piping system, a pipe that originates in or discharges into another pipe. Also known as branch line.
(hydrology)
A small stream that merges into another, generally bigger, stream.
(mathematics)
A complex function which is analytic in some domain and which takes on one of the values of a multiple-valued function in that domain.
A section of a curve that is separated from other sections of the curve by discontinuities, singular points, or other special points such as maxima and minima.
(nuclear physics)
A product resulting from one mode of decay of a radioactive nuclide that has two or more modes of decay.
(organic chemistry)
(science and technology)
An area of study representing an independent offshoot of a related basic discipline.

branch

In plumbing, a pipe which originates in or discharges into a main, submain, riser, or stack.

branch

(mathematics)
An edge in a tree.

branch

(programming)
A jump.

branch

(1) In a low-level programming language, a statement that directs the computer to go to some other part of the program. In assembly languages, "branch" or "jump" instructions provide this capability. In high-level languages, a "goto" statement, as well as several other programming constructs, provide the equivalent of the branch. For example, "IF A EQUALS B GOTO MATCH_ROUTINE." See branch prediction and do loop.

(2) A connection between two blocks in a flowchart or two nodes in a network.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tree to 12 m tall with open pyramidal crown; branches slightly pendulous; bark brown to orange-brown, scaly, irregularly fissured; branchlets green or yellow-green the second year, brown or gray thereafter; buds acute, 1 cm long, brown.
Jeddeloh' is slow growing, with branches angling up and out, branchlets weeping at the tips.
Botanically, Rhus natalensis is a shrub 2-3 m high or a small tree up to 8 m tall; bark of the branchlets greyish or white and older ones dull grey, lenticillate and rough.
Infructescence paniculate, elongated, conical, 9,5 cm in the widest portion, with fruiting branchlets 4, 2-5 cm long, minutely puberulent; floral bracts flat in the base of the fruit, 3 mm long, ca.
The flower buds appear like jet-black mulberry fruits born tight to the developing branchlets, until each of their short stems develop and form panicles.
Variation in plant height, foliage density, leaf surface area, number of leaves and branchlets, and number and type of inflorescences, can affect the abundance and distribution of foliage-dwelling spiders (Hatley & MacMahon 1980; Evans 1997; Halaj et al.
ARIZONA CYPRESS (Cupressus arizonica) Native to central Arizona, this upright to pyramidal tree has scalelike branchlets that vary from green to blue-gray to silver, depending on variety.
5 cm in diameter, leafy, prominently grooved, bears dense, small, leafy branches and branchlets.
Stems flat in cross section; branchlets flattened, 4.
New branches will start at the end of the cut and number of branchlets will be produced.
Beth Uyehara of Reseda sent an e-mail about a jacaranda tree planted last October that is ``as tall as our mature apricot tree but looks like a pole with short leafy branchlets coming out all around it.