brandy


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Related to brandy: Cognac

brandy

[for brandywine, from Du.,=burnt, i.e., distilled, wine], strong alcoholic spirit distilled from wine or from marc, the residue of the wine press. The most noted brandy is cognac, made from white grapes in the Charente district of France. The label Cognac, fine champagne denotes the finest type of cognac, which comes from a small area around Cognac. Brandy is manufactured commercially in other districts of France, notably Armagnac, and in Spain, Portugal, Australia, Italy, South Africa, and the United States. Most fine brandies are distilled in pot stills constructed to retain the volatile ingredients. The product is blended and flavored, then stored in casks (preferably oak), where it mellows and takes on a yellow color; it acquires a deeper tint from long storage or the addition of caramel syrup. Brandy marketed in the United States must be matured in cask for at least four years. Brandy made from marc is very potent and is inferior to wine brandy. Liquor distilled from fermented beets, grains, or sugarcane is sometimes called brandy. The term, qualified by the name of a fruit, is applied to spirits distilled from the fermented juice of fruits other than the grape, e.g., peach brandy, cherry brandy, and plum brandy (slivovitz), which is extensively manufactured in the Balkans.

Brandy

 

(Russian, kon’iak), a strong alcoholic beverage distilled primarily from dry white grape wines and aged in oaken barrels or cisterns with oaken staves. During the aging process brandy, which has an alcoholic content of 65–70 percent by volume is enriched with tannins and acquires its characteristic taste, bouquet, and color. At the same time, oxidizing processes are influenced by oxygen from the air. Distilled water is used to lower the alcoholic content of brandy. The production of brandy is especially widespread in France, in Charente Department (administrative center, Cognac), where the fine French brandy known as cognac is made.

In the Soviet Union two basic kinds of brandies are made, depending on the length of aging: ordinary brandies (from three to five years old, with the age indicated by asterisks) and fine brandies. The latter include KV, or aged brandy (from six to seven years), KWK, or highest quality aged brandy (eight to ten years), and KC, or old brandy (aged more than ten years). High-quality brandies are made in Armenia, Georgia, Moldavia, Azerbaijan, the Ukraine, and the Northern Caucasus. Other countries producing brandy include Italy, Spain, and Greece.

brandy

[′bran·dē]
(chemical engineering)
A potable alcoholic beverage distilled from wine or fermented fruit juice, usually after the aging of the wine in wooden casks; cognac is a brandy distilled from wines made from grapes from the Cognac region of France.

brandy

1. an alcoholic drink consisting of spirit distilled from grape wine
2. a distillation of wines made from other fruits
References in classic literature ?
The trader sighed contemplatively, and poured out some more brandy.
But the inclination for a run, encouraged by confidence in his luck, and by a draught of brandy from his pocket-pistol at the conclusion of the bargain, was not easy to overcome, especially with a horse under him that would take the fences to the admiration of the field.
And when I say "drinking," I speak not of smuggled gin or of brandy bottles held fiercely by the neck till they are empty.
The Admiral was in the chimney-corner, once more 'sirrupping' some brandy and water, and Esther sat at the table at work.
The brandy I did not touch, for I have been an abstainer from my birth.
I'll go to the Hermitage--I think I've got some brandy there.
He was undoubtedly an officer, and he was decorated after the manner of the Russians with little enamelled crosses, and he could talk, and(though this has nothing to do with his merits) he had been given up as a hopeless task, or cask, by the Black Tyrone, who individually and collectively, with hot whiskey and honey, mulled brandy, and mixed spirits of every kind, had striven in all hospitality to make him drunk.
Besides a sufficient stock of pure brandy, he arranged two water-tanks, each of which contained twenty-two gallons.
Good, who had charge of the flask of brandy, got it out and looked at it longingly; but Sir Henry promptly took it away from him, for to drink raw spirit would only have been to precipitate the end.
And Pritchard needn't get up any wine: brandy was the best thing against infection.
Really I think your behaviour with regard to the brandy is most unkind and ungenerous; I shall be ill, I know I shall.
The attendant, who still moved about like a man in a dream, brought them some brandy and soda and served them with shaking hand.