brassica oleracea


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Related to brassica oleracea: Brassica oleracea acephala, wild cabbage
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broccoli
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broccoli
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broccoli

broccoli

Helps prevent cancer, protects heart and circulatory system, builds strong bones, high vitamin A and C, calcium. What we normally call “broccoli”, is actually the top portion with unopened flower buds. If we let them grow, they open into small yellow flowers that have a mild spicy broccoli flavor and are delicious in salads. One way to identify a plant from the mustard family (all of which are edible) is the flowers have 4 petals with 6 stamens–4 tall and 2 short.

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cabbage
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cabbage
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cabbage
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cabbage

cabbage

Same plant as Broccoli. Cancer fighter with vitamin A, C, D, potassium, calcium, selenium, zinc, iron. Assists in digestion and helps prevent ulcers. One of the main plants used in making fermented foods, promoting beneficial probiotic gut flora. Used throughout history for cancer, arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, cold sores, colon, bowel, intestines, IBS, detox, gangrene, gout, hangover, headache, hemorrhoids, infection, joint pain, liver, lungs, osteoporosis, arthritis, shingles, sore throat, stomach problems, ulcers, tumors, warts- you name it. In the mustard family. Whole plant is edible, leaves, seeds. Grows wild too. One way to identify a plant from the mustard family (all of which are edible) is the flowers have 4 petals with 6 stamens–4 tall and 2 short.

collard greens

Cancer fighting, rich in calcium, vitamin A, B, great source of chlorophyll, oxygen, sulfur and a zillion other healthy things. Very popular in India and Pakistan, both root and leaves. Can be eaten raw, cooked or juiced, but blend it for maximum results. Raw foodists use collard greens as a wrap instead of flour-based wraps. In cabbage/ broccoli family. Cancer-fighting properties include diindolylmethane and sulforaphane. Potent antiviral, antibacterial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative studies of the aqueous extracts of Ocimum gratissimum, Aloe vera, Brassica oleracea and Ipomoea batatas on some biochemical parameters in diabetic rats.
Table 1: Effect of methanol extract of Brassica oleracea leaves on blood glucose level in hyperglycemic mice following 120 minutes of glucose loading.
Various members of the Brassica oleracea family have been reported to have antihyperglycemic effects.
As part of the screening process to locate plants with antihyperglycemic properties, this study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperglycemic potential of methanol extract of leaves of Brassica oleracea, Centella asiatica, and Zizyphus mauritiana in oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) in glucose-overloaded mice.
Table 1: Identified constituents produced from steam distilled enzymes hydrolysates of Brassica oleracea var.
Plant name: Brassica oleracea caulorapa or Brassica oleracea var.
Characteristics of glossy leaf waxes associated with resistance to diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) in Brassica oleracea.
Glossy leaf wax and plant resistance to insects in Brassica oleracea under natural infestation.
Evers (1968) listed this species on Aristolochia grandiflora, Brassica oleracea botrytis group, Brassica oleracea acephala group and Xanthosoma roseum.
Brassicaceae] Lipaphis pseudobrassicae Brassica oleracea L.
Scientific name Common name Vegetables Pisum sativae Garden pea Lactuca sativa Lettuce cv butterhead Brassica oleraceae cv Acephala Kale Phaseolus vulgaris Green bean Daucus carota Carrot Brassicae oleracea cv Capitata Cabbage Brassica oleracea cv Gemmifera Brussels sprouts Allium cepeae Onion Cucumis sativa Cucumber Allium sativum Garlic Brassica oleracea cv Acephala Collards Solanum melongea Eggplant Solanum lycopersicum Tomato Capsicum annuum Bell pepper Apium graveolens Celery Abelmoschus esculentus Okra Foeniculum vulgare Fennel Zea mays Sweet corn Ornamental plants Nerium oleander Oleander Hippeastratum sp.