breaking stress

breaking stress

[′brāk·iŋ ‚stres]
(mechanics)
The stress required to fracture a material whether by compression, tension, or shear.

breaking stress

The stress at which a component ruptures under a tensile force.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The modulus at a given strain, breaking stress and elongation-at-break were obtained from the stress-strain curves.
In compression tests, the tapioca starch-xanthan gum gels exhibited lower Young's modulus (E) and breaking stress values than those of gels made with tapioca starch alone, after a storage period of greater than seven days, indicating that xanthan gum delayed the retrogradation in tapioca starch gels.
4b shows that surface compression gives reliable value for the average breaking stress.
If you try to find a correlation between fracture bending stress and average diameter of the indentation we recognize that the larger the indentation the less is the scatter range of the breaking stress, see Fig.
connective tissue protein) content and the toughness of abalone, as measured by breaking stress assays, with a lower collagen content (more tender) product being preferred by sensory panels (Olaechea et al.
It has a breaking stress (stress in GPa at the breaking point) comparable to steel and presents a toughness (i.
Can increase stiffness, modulus, yield stress, breaking stress, and heat-deflection temperature.
It can be concluded that the fiber populations seem to differ mostly in the level of the relatively flat so-called hardening region and thus the breaking stress value.
The scatter in the breaking stress of these bars was analyzed using the Weibull statistical technique that has been established as a useful method of quantifying the effect of turbulent filling conditions and the consequential entrainment of oxide films on the reliability of castings.
The material blended by the 52 s approach displayed the weakest breaking stress capabilities.