seizure

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Related to breakthrough seizure: epilepsy

seizure

Pathol a sudden manifestation or recurrence of a disease, such as an epileptic convulsion

Seizure

 

a pathological neuropsychic state that arises in an abrupt fitlike manner. Seizures frequently take the form of convulsions or other involuntary movements accompanied by clouding of consciousness. This stage is later replaced by a deep pathological sleep or stupor. Epilepsy, hysteria, and diseases of the brain can produce seizures. Seizures may occur in the form of a sudden relaxation of muscle tone (cataplectic seizure) or a sudden falling asleep (narcoleptic seizure). The term “seizure” is also used in the broader sense of paroxysm.

seizure

[′sē·zhər]
(medicine)
The sudden onset or recurrence of a disease or an attack.
Specifically, an epileptic attack, fit, or convulsion.
References in periodicals archive ?
That continuous substitution with different generics isn't such a big deal for a patient using generic Vicodin to treat an achy back; however, for a patient with epilepsy, the frequent variance in potency can mean the difference between a normal, seizure-free life or risking breakthrough seizures, brain damage and even death -- along with all the additional expenses associated with these unfortunate outcomes.
These intranasal product formulations seek to address the need for a convenient and effective therapy that could help reduce acute breakthrough seizures and avoid the need for costly emergency room visits.
Epilepsy has a high negative impact on both children and their families and there is a pressing need for new treatment options as too many children still experience breakthrough seizures," points out study author Professor Renzo Guerrini from the Children's Hospital Anna Meyer-University of Florence, Italy.
The combination of alcohol consumption, sleep deprivation (as alcohol consumption is often associated with evening social events), and missed medication can lower seizure threshold and place the adolescent at risk for breakthrough seizures.
Although physicians who treat epilepsy patients often express concerns about bioavailability differences between a branded AED and its generic version, which could lead to breakthrough seizures, generic AEDs have an important role in the treatment of epilepsy, and several popular branded second-generation AEDs contend with strong direct generic competition.
First line treatment for epilepsy includes anticonvulsants, which can be difficult to accurately prescribe and administer to children and breakthrough seizures are still possible even when anticonvulsants are administered.