breastwork

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breastwork

[′brest‚wərk]
(ordnance)
Earthwork, constructed wholly or partly above the surface of the ground, which gives protection for defenders in a standing position, firing over the crest.

breastwork

1. Masonry work for a chimney breast.
2. The parapet of a building.
3. A defensive wall, hastily constructed, about breast high, often protecting the summit of a mound.
References in periodicals archive ?
Artillery pieces in gun breastworks appear as horseshoe-shaped earth heaps and are very difficult to camouflage.
An effective security system protects a company's computer operations with a series of defenses, like the walls and breastworks around a fort.
The Five Fingers jump in Idaho has five drive lanes marked by 680-m high rock cairns, as well as several stone fences and breastworks (Agenbroad, 1978).
Or what he called "those who hide behind the breastworks of corporate organizations.
Although breastworks were scorned by many commanders as a barrier to true bravery, Greene, a civil engineer by training, had his men throw up a bulwark, which disguised how thinly held the hill was and protected his precious brigade of 1,350 against the 4,000 to 5,000 attackers they faced.
To venture now and then from behind the breastworks won't result in the destruction of the fort.
At the very least, he could have advanced his howitzers to the edge of the clearing to smash the breastworks before launching an assault.
Work gangs cleared and staked out fields of fire, while each regiment was assigned a 100-yard sector along a defensive line of trenches that were protected by a log breastwork topped with sandbags.
Our orders were to run to the breastwork and get in if we could," a survivor recalled.
The height of the wall appears to have varied between 4 and 6 m, including breastworks.
While Hampton's main force slowly struggled forward, he set his 300 or so men to work preparing a defensive position--a series of breastworks and an abatis of sharpened tree branches, similar to the one Montcalm had used with such deadly effect at Carillon in 1758.
In addition to natural barriers, they faced barricades of wire, concrete, log breastworks, caves, dugouts and gun emplacements.