breath


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

breath

1. the intake and expulsion of air during respiration
2. the air inhaled or exhaled during respiration
3. a single respiration or inhalation of air, etc

What does it mean when you dream about breath?

Many people have problems breathing during sleep, even if they do not have full-blown apnea, and this can be reflected in one’s dream life. If not an apnea symptom, holding one’s breath in a dream represent an expression of will, or repressing one’s anxieties or emotions. Breathing is also central to an unusually large number of idioms: “a breath of fresh air,” “a waste of breath,” “take your breath away,” “catch your breath,” “out of breath,” and the like, any one of which could find expression in one’s dreams.

References in classic literature ?
And there lay the hoary head of good Father Hooper upon the death pillow, with the black veil still swathed about his brow, and reaching down over his face, so that each more difficult gasp of his faint breath caused it to stir.
At length the death-stricken old man lay quietly in the torpor of mental and bodily exhaustion, with an imperceptible pulse, and breath that grew fainter and fainter, except when a long, deep, and irregular inspiration seemed to prelude the flight of his spirit.
Father Hooper's breath heaved; it rattled in his throat; but, with a mighty effort, grasping forward with his hands, he caught hold of life, and held it back till he should speak.
One day he found himself arrested; his arm was seized by a portly personage, who had turned back on recognizing the young man and expended much breath in overtaking him.
Could it be Beatrice's breath which thus embalmed her words with a strange richness, as if by steeping them in her heart?
So Alice picked him up very gently, and lifted him across more slowly than she had lifted the Queen, that she mightn't take his breath away: but, before she put him on the table, she thought she might as well dust him a little, he was so covered with ashes.
I do, too," nodded Pollyanna, again with that choking little breath.
The last time of these two had well-nigh been fatal to me, for the sea having hurried me along as before, landed me, or rather dashed me, against a piece of rock, and that with such force, that it left me senseless, and indeed helpless, as to my own deliverance; for the blow taking my side and breast, beat the breath as it were quite out of my body; and had it returned again immediately, I must have been strangled in the water; but I recovered a little before the return of the waves, and seeing I should be covered again with the water, I resolved to hold fast by a piece of the rock, and so to hold my breath, if possible, till the wave went back.
The perspiration stood in beads upon his face, his knees knocked together, his every limb trembled, the power of articulation was quite gone; and there he stood, panting for breath, gazing on them with such livid ashy looks, that they were infected with his fear, though ignorant of its occasion, and, reflecting his dismayed and horror-stricken visage, stared back again without venturing to question him; until old John Willet, in a fit of temporary insanity, made a dive at his cravat, and, seizing him by that portion of his dress, shook him to and fro until his very teeth appeared to rattle in his head.
I don't see much in that,' said John, drawing a long breath, and looking round him like a man who felt relieved.
This elicited a word or two of explanation from Clennam, during the delivery of which the short dark man held his breath and looked at him.
Flora had at last talked herself out of breath for one moment.