breech pressure

breech pressure

[′brēch ‚presh·ər]
(ordnance)
In interior ballistics, the pressure from the propellant gases acting against the inner face of the breechblock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Built on a Howa or Remington 700 centerfire action, the BP Xpress Hunter is designed for long-range muzzleloading performance and engineered to withstand a breech pressure of 125,000 psi.
The 213-grain, roundnose, jacketed bullet had a velocity of 1,968 fps and a breech pressure of 37,000 psi.
It can be said that the history of progress in powders from black powder days has been a story of development of slower and slower gunpowders, producing higher and higher velocities within the standard limitations of case capacity, rifle strength, breech pressure, and recoil.
The approach to this point in a series of progressively heavier and heavier charges can be observed on a chronograph, when each heavier load produces a smaller increment of velocity, until a point is reached at which another half-grain of propellant delivers little or no more muzzle velocity but a possibly-disastrous increase in breech pressure.
The 1971-72 edition lists 82 grains max for 2,670 fps and 52,000 CUP breech pressure, but the 1975-76 edition shows a top charge of only 78 grains, for 2,620 fps and 52,700 CUP
Long before the breechblock has started rearward from the recoil the bullet has left the 4-1/2-inch barrel and breech pressure has dropped to zero.
The 1895 was Winchester's response to the appearance of smokeless powders and cartridges with pointed bullets and high breech pressures.
The ordinance drafted by Assistant City Attorney Henry Morris defines design specifications, including breech pressures, of Saturday Night Specials.
At Metal Storm's Annual General Meeting of stockholders in April 2002, the company's President and Chief Executive Officer, Mike O'Dwyer, outlined two independent research efforts in the high technical risk area where internal breech pressures exceed 50,000 psi.