bright band

bright band

[′brīt ‚band]
(meteorology)
The enhanced echo of snow as it melts to rain, as displayed on a range-height indicator scope.

bright band

A radar echo on the range-height indicator scope, which is reflected by ice particles of high reflectivity. These echoes are narrow but intense.
References in classic literature ?
A bright band of light fell through the parlour door into the part of the shop behind the counter.
More than 7000 stars and planets and the bright band of the Milky Way are visible with the naked eye, making each visit a unique experience.
At vertical incidence, dry columnar and irregular ice crystals can have elevated LDR values that fall between the system limit and the LDR measured in the bright band (Matrosov et al.
Most, however, compared it to the bright band bordering the limb of the airless Moon that had been reported during the partial phases of solar eclipses, a phenomenon that Astronomer Royal George Biddell Airy had dismissed in 1864 as "strictly an ocular nervous phenomenon.
Two branches of the star were rather weak and by visual observation oriented perpendicular to each other, with a third and more prominent bright band intersecting them with an angle of 45[degrees].
Eye on Edge is currently selling three types of energy wristbands, the 3000, 2000 and silicone bright band.
But spare a thought for Christian Edwards and his bright band of footballing scholars who were only denied by goals scored as their goal average was unbelievably level with Haverfordwest.
orientates using the bright band of light produced by the Milky Way," the scientists wrote.
On fore- and hindwings, undermarginal bright band thin and winding.
Stargazers and professional astronomers have a hard time seeing the galaxy through the Milky Way's bright band of stars, dust and gas.
This annulus of cold air, nicknamed the 'cold collar', appears as a bright band in the ultraviolet images.