brilliant


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brilliant

1. (of a colour) having a high saturation and reflecting a considerable amount of light; vivid
2. Music (of the tone of an instrument) having a large proportion of high harmonics above the fundamental

Brilliant

 

a diamond that has been cut to a specific form (the so-called brilliant cut), with a specific number of facets, bringing out the maximum natural brilliance of the stone. Such a cut is also applied to other stones, such as rock crystal and topaz. The form of the brilliant cut is a combination of two pyramids, one of which (the upper) is truncated. The facets of the crown and pavilion are arranged in several tiers. A triple tier is common (the so-called triple brilliant cut). In classical gem cutting, the diamond has 56 lateral facets. The facets are placed in such a way that a parallel light beam falling on the surface of the gem is subjected to total reflection within the diamond. The light thus reflected is refracted into the rays of the spectrum because of the high light dispersion in the diamond. Thus, in reflected light a brilliant sparkles with all the colors of the rainbow.

Brilliants are used in jewelry making: they are mounted in settings of precious metals, either singly (most often in rings, earrings, and cufflinks) or in groups, forming separate elements or the entire basis of the composition of a piece of jewelry (such as a brooch or tiara). Brilliants adorn certain metals and higher orders of distinction (such as the Order of Victory and the Marshal’s Star). The mass of a brilliant is measured in carats.

IU. D. AKSENTON

brilliant

A term used to describe armaments that are not only smart (i.e., capable of precision guidance) but that can be reprogrammed in air, if required. Brilliant munitions guide themselves to the target without any external guidance or inputs.

Brilliant

One of five pedagogical languages based on Markov algorithms, used in ["Nonpareil, a Machine Level Machine Independent Language for the Study of Semantics", B. Higman, ULICS Intl Report No ICSI 170, U London (1968)].

See also Diamond, Nonpareil, Pearl, Ruby.
References in classic literature ?
When Jim was still an obscure young lawyer, struggling to make his way in New York, his career was suddenly advanced by a brilliant marriage.
Here, also, in summer, various brilliant annuals, such as marigolds, petunias, four-o'clocks, found an indulgent corner in which to unfold their splendors, and were the delight and pride of Aunt Chloe's heart.
It was constructed of gleaming white marble inlaid with gold and brilliant stones which sparkled and scintillated in the sunlight.
Fore and aft rose two cages of medium height with inclined sides, and partly closed by thick lenticular glasses; one destined for the steersman who directed the Nautilus, the other containing a brilliant lantern to give light on the road.
In her short, but brilliant, career she has taught me nothing, but she has given me everything.
More obvious, more prominent, shone on by the full light of the large window, were the occupants of the benches just before me, of whom some were girls of fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, some young women from eighteen (as it appeared to me) up to twenty; the most modest attire, the simplest fashion of wearing the hair, were apparent in all; and good features, ruddy, blooming complexions, large and brilliant eyes, forms full, even to solidity, seemed to abound.
into the city of Blois had been noisy and brilliant his young majesty had therefore appeared perfectly satisfied with it.
in yon brilliant window-niche How statue-like I me thee stand, The agate lamp within thy hand
It has also found out that they will entertain a brilliant and distinguished circle of the ELITE of the BEAU MONDE (the fashionable intelligence is weak in English, but a giant refreshed in French) at the ancient and hospitable family seat in Lincolnshire.
Naked boys of nine years and the fancy-dressed children of luxury; shreds and tatters, and brilliant uniforms; jackass-carts and state-carriages; beggars, Princes and Bishops, jostle each other in every street.
Here and there the brilliant rays penetrated to earth, but for the most part they only served to accentuate the Stygian blackness of the jungle's depths.
The officer had followed the brilliant train in the air; he endeavored to precipitate himself upon the barrel and tear out the match before it reached the powder it contained.