bristlecone pine


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Related to bristlecone pine: Great Basin Bristlecone Pine

bristlecone pine,

common name for the pinepine,
common name for members of the Pinaceae, a family of resinous woody trees with needlelike, usually evergreen leaves. The Pinaceae reproduce by means of cones (see cone) rather than flowers and many have winged seeds, suitable for wind distribution.
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 species Pinus longaeva, found in the White Mountains of California. Specimens have been known to live some 5,000 years.

bristlecone pine

[‚bris·əl‚kōn ′pīn]
(botany)
A small slow-growing evergreen tree of the genus Pinus that grows at high altitudes in the western United States, having dense branches with rust-brown bark and short needles in bunches of five and thorn-tipped cone scales. The two types are P. longaeva, which lives longer than any other tree (over 4000 years), and P. monophylla, the single-leaf pinyon.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the chronology from the San Juan bristlecone pines showed something completely new:
Bristlecone pine tree rings and volcanic eruptions over the last 5000 yr.
Forest Service scientist Anna Schoettle, is trying to assess diversity of bristlecone pines and to identify, for collection, germplasm that represents what is in the wild.
When I looked at a slice of a bristlecone pine at the visitors' center, I was surprised at how thin the rings are.
No, not Aerosmith--it's a 4,723-year-old bristlecone pine (Pinus called the Methuselah Tree.
ON a desolate mountain-top in California lives the world's oldest living organism - a gnarled and twisted bristlecone pine named Methuselah.
In this, it probably edges out the giant sequoia but not the bristlecone pine, which lives up to 4,800 years.
The intermountain bristlecone pine was a special find--and has a special story behind it.
It is a diverse group with deep roots, and one whose resilience matches the bristlecone pine, a conifer found in Great Basin National Park that can live upwards of 5,000 years.
When we reached the summit, we took photos and marveled at a gnarled bristlecone pine near the peak, blanketed in snow.
Furthermore, bristlecone pine trees high in the Sierra Nevada mountains experienced stunted growth and frost damage in 1761, according to Pang.
Known as the "redwood of the south," the alerce is a gargantuan tree that is exceeded in lifespan only by California's bristlecone pine.