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broad

a wood-turning tool used for shaping the insides and bottoms of cylinders
References in periodicals archive ?
OPAL Broaden and OPAL Beyond met their primary efficacy endpoints showing a statistically significant improvement with tofacitinib 5 mg and 10 mg twice daily (BID) compared to treatment with placebo at three months as measured by American College of Rheumatology 20 (ACR20) response (OPAL Broaden: p?
paragraph] 4 Where reissue applications likely serve a valuable function in the patent system, how can we separate the wheat from the chaff so that patent owners may broaden claim scope after the statutory window of two years after issuance has closed, while still protecting the public's right to rely on the scope of the patent as originally issued?
It would also appear to be important for rehabilitation researchers to broaden their scope of reading to include other disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, and disability policy studies.
Daphne Dumont, Past President of the CBA announced a program that includes (1) the formation of a Coalition of nine organizations that have similar concerns regarding legal aid, (2) with Coalition partners, taking the CBA's Legal Aid Watch to the grassroots, and (3) the selection of test cases to broaden the scope of a constitutional right to legal representation.
After all, her employees were a known quantity--better skilled and more reliable than the temporary workers--and in many cases were eager for opportunities to broaden their professional horizons.
When you look at it in this way, the issue begins to broaden.
Burrell says his agency, which has $90 million in annual billings and also does public relations work, could make similar deals to further enhance and broaden its services.
AT&T said it seeks to broaden high-speed Internet availability in rural Kansas in the coming few years.
One of Hayes' objectives over the past decade has been to broaden the demographic of the revolutionary green movement beyond its core constituency of white yuppies and hippies.
She concludes that the Miwok approach exemplifies a mutually beneficial interplay between cultural practices and botanical conservation, suggesting conservationists could broaden their notion of species preservation to include such interplay.