bromegrass

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Related to brome: Brome grass, bromegrass, Bromus

bromegrass

[′brōm‚gras]
(botany)
The common name for a number of forage grasses of the genus Bromus in the order Cyperales.
References in periodicals archive ?
The real value of land can be measured, Brome implies, by how much profit it can generate for entrepreneurs.
The five species of brome grasses growing in the UK can reduce yields and quality, but must be correctly identified because control measures are different depending on the variety.
The bank's attractive prepayment schedule also provided enhanced flexibility for the owners going forward," added Brome.
Rev Rob Axford, rector of Brome, said: "There is a real sense of shock in the community.
The check cultivars included Manchar smooth brome, Regar meadow brome, Fawn tall fescue (E.
That's because wheat roots extend deeper into soil than those of downy brome and can extract fertilizer that's moved a couple of inches down.
Fescue and brome grasses grow up and down ravines while native grasses are less likely to spread that fast.
Ira Clark takes what he calls a 'sociopolitical' approach to Massinger, Ford, Shirley, and Brome, presenting them as addressing a small privileged audience on matters that habitually interest an influential elite: the manipulation of power and the intrigues that the pursuit of power encourages.
The relationship developed into friendship, and Jonson wrote a sonnet to Brome which was prefixed to Brome's Northern Lasse (published 1632).
HFF senior managing director Dana Brome, director Tina Derderian and senior real estate analyst Carlos Febres-Mazzei secured a five-year, fixed-rate loan through MetLife Real Estate Investments for the Los Angeles property.
please note installing the new drain pipe shall require placing it under a retaining wall; install new french drains; regrade driveway to repair and fill erosion damage; install rock and erosion blanket; seed with smooth brome and cover crop of oat or barley.