brood pouch


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brood pouch

[′brüd ‚pau̇ch]
(vertebrate zoology)
A pouch of an animal body where eggs or embryos undergo certain stages of development.
References in periodicals archive ?
Side of tail mainly tan shading to brownish caudad; brood pouch folds pale with light shading of grey, mostly concentrated along posterior margin of pouch; venter of tail elsewhere mainly tan shading to brownish caudad; pectoral and anal fins pale to transparent; dorsal fin rays each with 2-3 dark markings, otherwise pale; caudal fin dark brown with narrow pale margin.
Male pregnancy in seahorses and pipefishes (Family Syngnathidae): Rapid diversification of paternal brood pouch morphology inferred from a molecular phylogeny.
Because both the volume of the female's abdominal cavity and volume of the male's sealed brood pouch potentially limit the number or size (or both) of embryos that can be successfully produced by seahorses (Boisseau, 1967), correlations between the dimensions of both parents and brood size likely reflect mutual mate selection for size (Vin cent and Sadler, 1995; Teixeira and Musick, 2001; Vincent and Giles, 2003).
Because juvenile release from the maternal brood pouch occurs over a few days, the day on which the female molted (females lay eggs after molting) was used as the starting date for the juveniles within each experimental tank.
On average, 87% of juveniles in each family remained on the same algal piece as their mother [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 2 OMITTED] after two weeks from their release from the brood pouch.
First, each brood pouch was divided into 14 sections and marked [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1B OMITTED].
Among the progeny in the brood pouch of pregnant male DM9-13, four maternal alleles (146, 150, 160, and 182) were observed for locus micro25.
A female "impregnated" him by inserting eggs in his brood pouch.
Although the duration of incubation is not known, all embryos in the brood pouch of a single individual are at comparable stages of development.
About 15 days after their release from the brood pouch, some of the larvae reared at room temperature metamorphosed into shelled veligers (Fig.
The radioactively labelled eggs could then be tracked using special instruments which registered how the nutrients moved from the embryos into the brood pouch and furthermore into the body of the male pipefish.
The male has about 100 embryos in its brood pouch, and anything from zero to all the eggs may be absorbed.