Brood

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brood

[brüd]
(botany)
Heavily infested by insects.
(zoology)
The young of animals.
To incubate eggs or cover the young for warmth.
An animal kept for breeding.

Brood

 

the young members of a family of birds or mammals (hatchlings, litters). Sometimes the term also refers to the offspring and both parents or one (in polygamous species). The number of young animals in the brood or litter varies greatly from species to species, depending upon their fertility; for example, birds can have from one to 24 hatchlings, and mammals can have from one to 20 young. Even within one species the number of young can vary; in particular, it depends upon the climatic conditions of the year and other such factors.

References in classic literature ?
The heavy scent of the roses seemed to brood over everything.
Nobody was at home, but Daylight dismounted and ranged the vegetable garden, eating strawberries and green peas, inspecting the old adobe barn and the rusty plough and harrow, and rolling and smoking cigarettes while he watched the antics of several broods of young chickens and the mother hens.
True love transcends the unworthy object and dwells and broods on the eternal, and when the poor interposed mask crumbles, it is not sad, but feels rid of so much earth and feels its independency the surer.
If he have the courage to stand in its place, and drive it out (he had once: being desperate), it broods upon his bed.
It was easy to know them, fluttering about with extended, protecting wings when any harm, real or imaginary, threatened their precious brood.
The truth was, that the little Puritans, being of the most intolerant brood that ever lived, had got a vague idea of something outlandish, unearthly, or at variance with ordinary fashions, in the mother and child, and therefore scorned them in their hearts, and not unfrequently reviled them with their tongues.
And in this same last or shoe, that old woman of the nursery tale, with the swarming brood, might very comfortably be lodged, she and all her progeny.
Mere messages in the earthly order of events had lately come to the English Crown and People, from a congress of British subjects in America: which, strange to relate, have proved more important to the human race than any communications yet received through any of the chickens of the Cock-lane brood.
And now his heart Distends with pride, and hardning in his strength Glories: For never since created man, Met such imbodied force, as nam'd with these Could merit more then that small infantry Warr'd on by Cranes: though all the Giant brood Of PHLEGRA with th' Heroic Race were joyn'd That fought at THEB'S and ILIUM, on each side Mixt with auxiliar Gods; and what resounds In Fable or ROMANCE of UTHERS Son Begirt with BRITISH and ARMORIC Knights; And all who since, Baptiz'd or Infidel Jousted in ASPRAMONT or MONTALBAN, DAMASCO, or MAROCCO, or TREBISOND, Or whom BISERTA sent from AFRIC shore When CHARLEMAIN with all his Peerage fell By FONTARABBIA.
WHAT a funny sight it is to see a brood of ducklings with a hen
They heard a frame crack stickily, saw it heaved high and twirled round between enormous hands--a blotched, bulged, and perished horror of grey wax, corrupt brood, and small drone-cells, all covered with crawling Oddities, strange to the sun.
The victims of his malicious remarks, it is true, had brothers enough to keep them in countenance; for, by Roderick's theory, every mortal bosom harbored either a brood of small serpents or one overgrown monster that had devoured all the rest.