brownstone

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brownstone,

red to brown variety of sandstonesandstone,
sedimentary rock formed by the cementing together of grains of sand. The usual cementing material in sandstone is calcium carbonate, iron oxides, or silica, and the hardness of sandstone varies according to the character of the cementing material; quartz sandstones
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. Its unusual color is caused in some instances by the presence of red iron oxide which acts as a cement, binding the sand grains together. Vast thicknesses (up to 20,000 ft/6,096 m) of brownstone were deposited in the present-day Connecticut River Valley of Massachusetts and Connecticut and in central New Jersey during the latter part of the Triassic periodTriassic period
, first period of the Mesozoic era of geologic time (see Geologic Timescale, table) from 205 to 250 million years ago.

Throughout the Triassic, E North America, as a result of the mountain-building episode that formed the Appalachians in the late Paleozoic
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. Quarries in these regions were the source for much of the building stone used in the late 19th and early 20th cent. in the construction of the many brownstone houses found from Baltimore to Boston; the stone, however, is not very durable, especially if poorly laid or maintained. Similar, but more brightly colored, sandstones also were deposited in the Rocky Mt. region during the Triassic period and Jurassic periodJurassic period
[from the Jura Mts.], second period of the Mesozoic era of geologic time, lasting from 213 to 144 million years ago. At the start of the Jurassic most of the continents were joined together until the Atlantic began to form and the Americas split off from Africa.
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. These deposits are called "redbeds" and make up the colorful landscapes of the Painted Desert of Arizona.

brownstone

A dark brown or reddish-brown sandstone, used extensively for building in the United States during the middle and late 19th century. See also: Stone

brownstone

[′brau̇n‚stōn]
(petrology)
Ferruginous sandstone with its grains coated with iron oxide.

brownstone

1. A dark brown or reddish brown arkosic sandstone, quarried and used extensively for building in the eastern US during the middle and late nineteenth cent.
2. A dwelling faced with brownstone, often a row house.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reminiscent of classic 19th century row houses of Chicago and New York, yet designed with native Texas materials and styling, The Brownstone offers a unique alternative to traditional residential choices.
Currently, brownstones seem to be [a] relative anomaly in the market," Miller said, adding: "It's a form of housing stock that's limited in availability and, for the moment, has been relatively unscathed" by the housing slump afflicting the rest of the city.
The installation of Rescue Archaeology, 2000-2004, has three major elements: a laboratory based on an existing archaeological lab in downtown Manhattan, a massive aluminum cabinet containing artifacts, and three fireplaces from the brownstones.
It's amazing," exclaims King, 32, who formed his company in April 2002 and purchased his first brownstone in a partnership deal for $500,000 in 2000.
In Chapter TV, "An/Other Way of Knowing Things," Alexander's discussion of Brown Girl, Brownstones emphasizes the cultural and transformational dilemmas of Deighton Boyce (the father), including invisibility and identity issues within an American household and community.
The new single-family house for a couple with one daughter is flanked by one of these dingy monsters, and on its other side, it has one of the few remaining brownstones, immensely perky, cheerful and decently scaled by comparison with the apartment blocks.
The Brownstones is a refreshing, lifestyle-based community featuring the city's natural trails and backdrop, coupled with the charm and convenience of urban-village living.
These brownstone-to-condo conversions are a great way to preserve the integrity of the neighborhoods and Brooklyn's brownstones while enabling occupancy for more people.
Brownstones, of course, are what most people think of when they think of Fort Greene.
Lopez had joined the Brownstones at 13 and had a record of run-ins with the law by the time he turned 18.
This is particularly true of LeSeur's overly long discussion of Marshall's Brown Girl, Brownstones.
From Brooklyn Heights to the Upper East Side, New York's historic brownstones, townhouses and other city homes, with their distinctive moldings, stained glass windows, carved staircases and ornate facades, stand out among America's finest residencies," said Ross Buchmueller, Chubb & Son National Sales Manager in the Personal Lines Division.

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