bucket

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bucket

1. any of various bucket-like parts of a machine, such as the scoop on a mechanical shovel
2. a cupped blade or bucket-like compartment on the outer circumference of a water wheel, paddle wheel, etc
3. Computing a unit of storage on a direct-access device from which data can be retrieved
4. Chiefly US a turbine rotor blade

Bucket

 

(in Russian, kovsh), in mining and construction machinery, a device for gripping and removing a portion of the earth (rock, material, and so on) from the matrix and moving it to the unloading area. The bucket should cut easily into the material being worked (for this the bucket may have a cutting edge, usually with teeth), and it should be sufficiently strong and durable. In addition, it should be easily filled and emptied. The buckets are attached to chains (chain-and-bucket excavators and loaders, bucket dredges, and drags), a rotor (rotary excavators), arms (power shovels and loaders), or a bucket frame or are suspended from a bearing structure of draglines and clamshells by chains and cables. The force necessary for cutting or digging up the material being worked is imparted to the buckets through these devices. The buckets may be cast, welded, or stamped. The buckets are usually unloaded on the side of the cutting edge or by opening the bottom, less frequently by forcing the earth out with a special scraper or a movable rear wall.

The bucket capacity of a mechanical shovel ranges from 0.15 to 200 eu m; for chain bucket excavators, 0.007 to 7 cu m; for single-bucket loaders, 0.07 to 30 cu m; for multibucket loaders, 0.005 to 0.1 cu m; for scrapers, 0.75 to 60 cu m; and for dredges, 0.05 to 1 cu m. Multibucket loaders, excavators, and dredges usually have 12 to 50 buckets; rotary excavators, six to 18.

The rotor blades of a bucket hydraulic turbine may also be called buckets. Elevators and conveyers may also be equipped with monorail buckets.


Bucket

 

the working element (scoop) of a scraper unit equipped with a cableway, used in excavating, transporting, and similar operations above the ground, underground, and underwater. The bucket is moved by a winch with a block and tackle.

REFERENCES

Dombrovskii, N. G. and M. I. Gal’perin. Zemleroino-transportnye mashiny. Moscow, 1965.
See also references under EXCAVATING MACHINES.

bucket

[′bək·ət]
(botany)
(computer science)
A name usually reserved for a storage cell in which data may be accumulated.
(engineering)
A cup on the rim of a Pelton wheel against which water impinges.
A reversed curve at the toe of a spillway to deflect the water horizontally and reduce erosiveness.
A container on a lift pump or chain pump.
A container on some bulk-handling equipment, such as a bucket elevator, bucket dredge, or bucket conveyor.
A water outlet in a turbine.

bucket

An attachment for a materials-handling or excavating machine that digs or carries loose materials such as earth, gravel, stone, or concrete; may be shaped like a scoop, with provision for opening and closing for convenience in unloading.

bucket

A reserved amount of memory that holds a single item or multiple items of data. Bucket is somewhat synonymous to "buffer," although buffers are usually memory locations for incoming data records, while buckets tend to be smaller holding areas for calculations. See hash table, buffer and variable.
References in classic literature ?
The guileless peasant set down his buckets and considered.
He heard also the water broken by the paddles of a canoe; the girl's voice giving orders, the voices of gipsies answering and coming nearer, the plumping and sucking noise of empty buckets plunged into a full stream; and finally the sound of many feet around the fire.
A huge Irishman at their head, they were passing buckets towards the after-hold; the press of people hid the hatchway from us until we gained the poop; but we heard the buckets spitting and a hose-pipe hissing into the flames below; and we saw the column of white vapor rising steadily from their midst.
Would you kindly send one of your constables for two buckets of water.
The grown-up view, indeed, was not much clearer than the view of the little creatures in bathing drawers who were trotting in to the foam all along the coasts of England, and scooping up buckets full of water.
After a few days' practice they could go up and down as gaily as buckets in a well.
I alone of boys had been able to elevate and lower my eyebrows separately; when the one was climbing my forehead the other descended it, like the two buckets in the well.
Sailors with buckets and mops were already beginning their nightly tasks.
Across the canon was the place for the mill, and there he erected it; and he erected, also, the endless chain of buckets, suspended from a cable and operated by gravity, that would carry the ore across the canon to the quartz-crusher.
As buckets of water were poured on him he groaned and moaned.
I pulled up three or four of the bottom boards, got a couple of buckets from a locker, and by unmistakable sign-language invited them to fall to.
In all unhandy places there were buckets, brooms, rags and bottles.