buffer


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Related to buffer: buffer solution

buffer,

solution that can keep its relative acidity or alkalinity constant, i.e., keep its pH constant, despite the addition of strong acids or strong bases. Buffer solutions are frequently solutions that contain either a weak acid and one of its salts or a weak base and one of its salts. Many acid-base reactions take place in living organisms. However, for organisms to perform certain vital functions, the body fluids associated with these functions must maintain a constant pH. For example, blood must maintain a pH of close to 7.4 in order to carry oxygen from the lungs to cells; blood is therefore a powerful buffer.

buffer

[′bəf·ər]
(chemistry)
A solution selected or prepared to minimize changes in hydrogen ion concentration which would otherwise occur as a result of a chemical reaction. Also known as buffer solution.
(computer science)
(ecology)
An animal that is introduced to serve as food for other animals to reduce the losses of more desirable animals.
(electricity)
An electric circuit or component that prevents undesirable electrical interaction between two circuits or components.
(electronics)
An isolating circuit in an electronic computer used to prevent the action of a driven circuit from affecting the corresponding driving circuit.
(engineering)
A device, apparatus, or piece of material designed to reduce mechanical shock due to impact.
(mining engineering)
Blasted material piled against or near a rock face to improve fragmentation and reduce scattering of rock from the next blast.
A movable metal plate set in place in a tunnel excavation to limit the amount of rock scattered during blasting.

buffer

1. A device, apparatus, or material which reduces mechanical shock due to impact.
2. A device located at the bottom of an elevator hoistway, designed to stop a car or counter-weight from descending beyond its normal limit of travel; motion beyond this limit is taken up by storing or by absorbing and dissipating the kinetic energy of the car or counterweight. Also see oil buffer, spring buffer.
3. Any type of barrier that limits the scattering of rock as a result

buffer

1
1. one of a pair of spring-loaded steel pads attached at both ends of railway vehicles and at the end of a railway track to reduce shock due to contact
2. Chem
a. an ionic compound, usually a salt of a weak acid or base, added to a solution to resist changes in its acidity or alkalinity and thus stabilize its pH
b. a solution containing such a compound
3. Computing a memory device for temporarily storing data
4. Electronics an isolating circuit used to minimize the reaction between a driving and a driven circuit

buffer

2
1. any device used to shine, polish, etc.; buff
2. a person who uses such a device

buffer

(1)
An area of memory used for storing messages. Typically, a buffer will have other attributes such as an input pointer (where new data will be written into the buffer), and output pointer (where the next item will be read from) and/or a count of the space used or free. Buffers are used to decouple processes so that the reader and writer may operate at different speeds or on different sized blocks of data.

There are many different algorithms for using buffers, e.g. first-in first-out (FIFO or shelf), last-in first-out (LIFO or stack), double buffering (allowing one buffer to be read while the other is being written), cyclic buffer (reading or writing past the end wraps around to the beginning).

buffer

(2)
An electronic device to provide compatibility between two signals, e.g. changing voltage levels or current capability.

buffer

A reserved segment of memory within a program that is used to hold the data being processed. Buffers are set up to hold data coming in from and going out to the network or a local file. In a streaming media application, the program uses buffers to store an advance supply of audio or video data to compensate for momentary delays.

With computers, each application can allocate and deallocate its buffers from the general memory pool. For printers and other peripherals, the buffers provide temporary storage for data in the memory of the device. See buffering, double buffering, buffer overflow, buffer flush and bucket.
References in classic literature ?
Datchery to himself that night, as he looked at his white hair in the gas-lighted looking-glass over the coffee-room chimneypiece at the Crozier, and shook it out: 'For a single buffer, of an easy temper, living idly on his means, I have had a rather busy afternoon
Then the four Buffers, taking heart of grace all four at once, say:
At which the four Buffers, again mysteriously moved all four at once, explain, 'You can't resist
A passing remembrance of Mrs Veneering, here induces Mortimer to address his next half-dozen words to her; after which he wanders away again, tries Twemlow and finds he doesn't answer, ultimately takes up with the Buffers who receive him enthusiastically.
Nexans developed the new LANmark-OF Tight Buffer Universal Cable using a new type of glass yarn that combines rodent protection with installer friendliness and avoids skin-irritation when compared to similar products of other vendors.
The Ministry of Finance decided on the 12th December 2013 that banks shall hold a countercyclical buffer of 1 percent from the 30th of June 2015.
They should disassemble the buttstock assembly and check if its buffer is within the date range.
In the case of the system presented in figure 1, when both buffers are compressed, they behave as if they were not linked, while in the case when a single buffer is compressed, at the same deformation, a force half of the previous one is obtained, because the volume of fluid that is compressed is double.
The underlying problem with buffer capacity decisions arises from two scenarios: In one, an operator temporarily works faster than their predecessor, so buffer stocks dwindle.
For metalcasting facilities, particularly lower-volume operations, it often is logical to have a buffer of inventory near shakeout, which is between a batch operation (pouring) and individual piece operations (grinding).
Riparian buffer zones are areas of vegetation that act like sponges that take up water and nutrients from the soil," explains Lowrance.